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    by Craig B | Feb 05, 2016

    image via SyndeticsThis is not about Blackstar, Bowie’s recent and final album, this is actually about Low, Bowie’s first album in his Berlin Trilogy from the 70’s, and a shameless plug for ACPL’s new subscription to Music (and Ebooks, etc.) on Hoopla.  Produced with Brian Eno, Low first presents itself as a sort of fun, out of this world pop recording, but near the end takes a turn to the darker side of things; kind of like Bowie was at Oktoberfest in Munich and then read a book about Warsaw and its plight during WWII.  I mean it’s interesting even if a little out of balance.  And here comes the shameless plug.  This album is now available to ACPL patrons because it’s on Hoopla ready for checkout, as are the other two albums in Bowie’s Berlin trilogy, Heroes and Lodger.  Last year at this time, if you had wanted to plumb the depths of Bowie’s time in Berlin you would have had to drop 30 bucks or so on some website somewhere, but now, well, everything has changed.

    Suggested Use: Organizing your sock drawer and need a little cerebral stimulation to keep your mind from going numb?  Engage with Bowie.  He may have gone to the other side but thanks to the modern recording era and services like Hoopla, he’s able to reach across the divide and help make sure we’re keeping on our toes.


    craig Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.

    by Kay S | Feb 03, 2016
    Dukes Prefer Blondes by Loretta Chase not to be confused with the movie Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

    In the latest Loretta Chase book we are faced with the problem of beauty. I like to call it h_chasethe Liz Taylor syndrome. I've talked about this before and the reality is that most of us can't work up that much sympathy for beautiful people, but I would imagine that some people who are knock dead gorgeous do have a not-worthy complex. Although their lives might seem to be perfect to an outsider, they want to be viewed as more than just this perfectly beautiful person. They probably also have a tendency to not trust people who they befriend. I'm sure a lot of "why is this person my friend" might creep into their thoughts. If your outside beauty is all that is talked about, I'm sure it would have some kind of effect on what you are as a person. I would also think that when great beauties age, they would feel even more alone  because now they are losing the one thing that drew people to them. Anyway, we have a great beauty in this book, Lady Clara Fairfax, and she wants to be more than just a pretty face. Which is why she is involved in a charity which helps young women find meaningful employment. Given the time period this couldn't have been all that easy.  This story reminded me a little of Oliver Twist, it had the feel of the stews of London. Even some of the shady characters in this story were reminiscent of Fagin, Artful Dodger and Bill Sykes. Ms. Chase did a fine job of presenting us with some of the more gritty elements of the brutal dark side of London's underbelly. There were some pretty memorable secondary characters in this story which Ms. Chase chose to leave behind in that dark place. I thought it was an interesting path to go down and I was grateful that there wasn't a butterfly-bird chirping ending for some of the supporting cast in this story.

    Then we have Raven Radford, a barrister, who is trying to clean up some of the criminals in London. One of those criminals being Jacob Freame, the same one Clara is trying to rescue a young boy by the name of Toby Coppy from. She comes to Radford hoping he will help her in locating Toby, Radford turns her down. However, that doesn't deter Clara from making herself into one of the biggest pest Radford has ever encountered. Clara has made a promise to Bridget Coppy. Clara is determined that she will find Bridget’s young brother. Nothing is going to stand in Clara’s way, especially an obnoxious barrister.

    Dukes Prefer Blondes could be divided into two stories. The first one is mostly Clara and Radford seeing who can come up with the most zingers. They have strong chemistry, they are clever and their dialog is pretty entertaining. The first half is a wonderful tug of war between Clara and Radford. Then they marry. The feel of the story changes. We now have a romance couple who are married before the end of the story. Ms. Chase invites us in to view our couple struggling to make their marriage work. Thrown into the mix of two newly married people who must learn to give and take is a big outside force. That outside force is Radford's sudden elevation as heir to a Dukedom - something he never wanted. He likes being a barrister, and is disheartened to learn that he will have to give up his career to eventually become a Duke. He isn't a happy camper. Clara on the other hand has been trained since childhood to fill the role of a Duchess and she is there to give him the support he needs along with a few suggestion on how he can have everything he wants.

    This may not reach the perfection of Ms. Chase's classic Lord of Scoundrels - silly, nothing will ever reach that height. But, Dukes Prefer Blondes is a very entertaining story with a delightful couple. Clara and Radford are more than just a couple who are good at funny repartee, there is also a great deal of growing together, of learning how to give, and how best to support each other.  This is one HEA which rings true.


    kayKay is an avid reader of historical romance books, maybe with a little trip into paranormal land and an occasional journey into mystery world.
    by Emily M | Feb 01, 2016

    Looking for a good book recommendation? Look no further!  Here’s a few good books I’ve enjoyed recently:


     
    The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming

    TheFamilyRomanovTsar Nicholas II, the last emperor of Russia, was executed in July of 1918, along with his wife, son, four daughters, and a handful of servants.  The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial Russia explores how this execution transpired.  Candace Fleming paints a fairly sympathetic picture of Tsar Nicholas II, depicting him not as a cruel, power-hungry dictator, but a shy, awkward, family-focused young man thrust into the role of tsar, one for which he was ill-prepared and did not particularly want.  Fleming skillfully weaves together descriptions of the Romanov family’s private life, the life of the common Russian peasant at this time, and the political events that ultimately led to Tsar Nicholas’s execution.  Actually a young adult book aimed at high school students, The Family Romanov is very accessible to the average reader.  Never dry or monotonous, The Family Romanov kept me as hooked as a fast-paced novel.   

     

    All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

    AlltheLightAnthony Doerr’s Pulitzer Prize-winning All the Light We Cannot See tells the parallel stories of two children, a blind French girl and an orphaned German boy, who grow up during the Nazi rise to power and live through the horrors of World War II. The story is told with short, nonlinear chapters that switch back and forth between the two protagonists’ points of view.  Lyrical prose makes All the Light We Cannot See lovely to read, but what really drew me in was the way it illustrated how one young boy, who was both smart and good, became a Nazi soldier who did terrible things – a story in microcosm of what the Nazi leadership did to their citizens as a whole.

     

    Life Together by Dietrich Bonhoeffer

    LifeTogetherDietrich Bonhoeffer was a German Lutheran pastor during the Nazi rise to power in the 1930s.  While the majority of Christian leadership in Germany during this time seemed to turn a blind eye to Nazi atrocities, Bonhoeffer spoke out publicly against them, an action that eventually forced him to go underground.  In 1943 he was arrested and imprisoned.  He was later sent to a concentration camp and then hanged.  He is now considered a martyr of the Christian faith and his writings are highly regarded as Christian classics.  Life Together was written to reflect upon his time living and teaching in an underground seminary and is meant to illustrate how Christians ought to live in community with one another.  This was the first work of Bonhoeffer’s that I had ever read and I was struck by what a wise and humble man he must have been. 

    What good books have you read lately?


    EmilyLong before becoming a librarian, Emily was an avid library patron. She enjoys reading fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, biographies, and classic children’s literature. Her favorite book is Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery.

     

    by Craig B | Jan 27, 2016

    image via SyndeticsBook Review:  The Travels of Jaime McPheeters by Robert Lewis Taylor

    For me, the essence of The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters, Robert Lewis Taylor's 1959 Pulitzer Prize win set in the California Gold Rush of the 1850s, is captured in the following statement from Jaimie McPheeters himself:

    "We knew the place (Hawkins' Oak), about a mile away toward town, a green, pasturey dell with a huge gnarled tree in the middle, from one of whose branches a man named Hawkins once was hung for stealing cattle and stirring up Indians."

    That conjuration of a scenic glade with a name indicating some gentle, local history that is then followed by a declaration of raw orneriness is just the type of one-two punch Taylor's story consistently delivers.  In one breath the reader might laugh out loud at some ridiculous scene created by the author (gamblers toasting a speech on temperance, for example) and in the next a man has been casually disposed of by an arrow through the throat.

    Now, this hard-cornered juxtaposition should not be underestimated as just a gimmick.  It is, I believe, a studied philosophy of living born from difficult experience.  (The title of this post is, perhaps, a decent summation.)  See, Taylor got his career started by writing biographical profiles for the New Yorker, gaining at least some insight into human foibles and tendencies.  He then began writing his first serious fiction during his time serving in WWII, a time from which perhaps his disaffection and sharp sense of humor arises.  (His first book, Adrift in a Boneyard, is a story about survivors disappointed by the inability of their wealth to preserve them in a post-apocalyptic world.)  In Jaimie he tells us things he’s learned (approaching them at a slightly lower octave than in Boneyard) with a sly grin that brings us in all the more.  Taylor seems to tell us that events are never as laughable as they might seem, nor are they as serious as some of us would have them be.  Real pain exists, people are products of their choices and rotten luck, death is something everyone lives with daily, yet life has a way of giving us little gifts and surprising us just when we think we’ve figured something out.  At least I hope that’s what Taylor is trying to tell us.  A person who seems to laugh at everything can be hard to pin down for easy answers, but then easy answers can be overrated.  Easy come, easy go, you know?

    craig Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by The Genealogy Center | Jan 25, 2016
    Editor's Note:  This post originally appeared on the Genealogy Center blog on December 20, 2015.  Catch the latest genealogy news by adding their blog to your RSS feed.  Click here to view the original post.

    1935
    The Genealogy Center has a fabulous “new” map for your viewing pleasure on our free Allen County, Indiana Resources page. It is a 1935 Business Loop map of downtown Fort Wayne, bordered by Brackenridge on the south, Webster on the west, Columbia and the railroad on the north and Barr on the east. From the whole map which serves as an overview, one may click on sections to see enlargements, to view the locations of theaters, churches, stores and residences all over downtown. Most businesses are specified, such as Patterson Fletcher, Stag Cigar, Bon Ton Bakery, Kroger Market, Baltes hotel and more, although some are just identified as barber or filling station. Buildings are identified by street number and trolley tracks are shown, as is Transfer Corner at Calhoun and Berry. At the top is a statistical summary of the types of businesses, including 18 shoe stores, 40 clothing stores, 22 barbers, 10 hotels, 12 markets, and 9 beer parlors. Residences are not identified by name. The map can be a bit confusing at first, as west is at the top, and a strong knowledge of the streets of Fort Wayne’s downtown or a current map may serve as an aid to browsing.
    by Becky C | Jan 22, 2016
    Ever wonder what library staff like to read?  Wonder no more!  Here's a quick look at some books we've enjoyed this month.  Click on a book cover to check availability — it’s as easy as that!

    WWR j 1
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    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her thumb has no hint of green whatsoever but luckily her plants are forgiving. Her favorite books are The Shannara series by Terry Brooks.
    by Evan | Jan 20, 2016

    Sometimes when I read a book I have to work past my jealousy to get to the good stuff. Happily, I was able to do that with Christopher McDougall's Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen, which wraps fascinating ideas about humanity's fundamental running nature inside a story of an extraordinary endurance race in the mountains of Mexico.

    Born to RunAs so often, the former journalist in me was jealous of the author's doggedness in researching and reporting a whole book. Writing half a page of newsprint always felt like a glorious achievement. Having my act together enough to write a book? Never.

    But this was worse because it is about the sublimity of running, which is an activity I gave up long ago. Ever since, I've disparaged running as something that's more likely to get you hurt than prolong your life, but the truth is I never got past the pain of it to reach that running high McDougall and others have enjoyed. And McDougall says the reason so many people get running injuries is not running itself but generations of running shoes that put an extra spring in your step nature does not want you to have.

    The nature part is what interests me the most. McDougall goes a bit over the top in his dramatic descriptions of the titular race and another one described early in the book, but when he gets into the science of how our ancestors ran and why, I'm hooked. My favorites are the parts about Daniel Lieberman and other researchers who believe early African humans separated themselves from other species with their ability to run long distances to kill antelope and similar prey. For instance, did you know that other animals have to breathe and stride and breathe and stride in a cycle, while humans are evidently uniquely able to do both at the same time? That means we use oxygen more efficiently. Combine that with our hairless bodies' ability to sweat out heat, plus some other genetic adjustments, and we can run on and on and on.

    Well, at least some of us can. McDougall says our brains constantly seek ways to minimize energy expenditure, and once our ancestors got settled and could get more food without burning calories though running, they did. Now, of course, most Americans can get food without any real exertion at all. Way too much food.

    Some of McDougall's science reporting strikes me as dubious, especially his comparison of Neanderthals and early European homo sapiens, but what the heck. Science and reporting are often imperfect. Part of the fun as a reader is to assess the new information and make my own judgments about it. If you are interested in distance running, human pre-history or the story of a mysterious tribe of super runners threatened by modernity, you will enjoy Born to Run as well.




    EvanEvan - Married, three children, two grandchildren, formerly a newspaper journalist, now a public librarian, at all times a board game nut.

    by Genie | Jan 18, 2016
    2016 scarf


    The Yarn Lovers group from the Woodburn branch library made 32 scarves for the 2016 Indiana Special Olympics during the last six months of 2015.  The scarves will be given to the athletes participating in the Indiana Winter Games and Polar Plunges along with the supporters and the volunteers.  The colors for the scarves were selected in collaboration with the launch of a new global “Play Unified” youth campaign that will inspire and mobilize youth around the world to connect with people with intellectual disabilities and create more inclusive communities, leading to a more respectful world for everyone. 

    If you are not familiar with the Special Olympics Indiana it is a not-for-profit organization that provides year-around sports training and athletic competition in more than 20 Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, reaching nearly 11,000 athletes across Indiana.  The group of ladies shown here are very proud to be able to contribute to this very worthy organization and have been doing so since 2012.  In addition to the Special Olympics, the Yarn Lovers have also supported The David Robinson Family Benefit and Caps for a Cause.

    Intrigued?  The Yarn Lovers meet Thursday evenings at the Woodburn  Branch Library.  They’re a pretty relaxed group so feel free to drop by any time between 7:00 pm and 8:45 pm.  Don’t know to crochet or knit?  No worries!  There’s always someone on hand who can help you get started and teach you a few new stitches!

    2015 Special Olympics Scarves

    2014 Special Olympics Scarves

    2012 Special Olympics Scarves



    by Kay | Jan 15, 2016
    The books just keep on coming! Here are a few of the upcoming "new" releases scheduled to be published between January 15 and February 14, 2016.

    Historical Romance
    h_bowen
    Kelly Bowen
    Duke of My Heart
    A Season for Scandal series
    January 26



    h_burrowes
    Grace Burrowes
    Will's True Wish
    True Gentlemen series
    February 2
    h_bryne
    Kerrigan Byrne
    The Hunter
    Victorian Rebels series
    February 2
    h_camp
    Candace Camp
    Enraptured
    Secrets of the Loch series
    January 19
    h_james
    Eloisa James
    My American Duchess
    Desperate Duchesses series
    January 26
    h_jenkins
    Beverly Jenkins
    Forbidden
    Silver and Gold series
    January 26

    Historical Fiction
    hf_white
    Karen White
    Beatriz Williams
    Lauren Willig
    The Forgotten Room
    January 19

    Contemporary Romance/Mainstream
    61dvr-Ac46L
    Katarina Bivald
    The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend
    Mainstream
    January 19



    c_buckley
    Carla Buckley
    The Good Goodbye
    January 12
    Mainstream



    c_hickman
    Trice Hickman
    Deadly Satisfaction
    Dangerous Love series
    Mainstream
    January 26
    c_kennedy
    Joanne Kennedy
    How to Wrangle a Cowboy
    Cowboys of Decker Ranch series
    Contemporary Romance
    February 2



    c_lynch
    Katie Lynch
    Confucius Jane
    Mainstream
    January 19
    c_mccarthy
    Jenna McCarthy
    Everything’s Relative
    Mainstream
    February 2
    c_mclaughlin (2)
    Jen McLaughlin
    Dare to Run
    The Sons of Steel Row series
    Contemporary Romance
    February 2
    c_murray
    J.J. Murray
    No Ordinary Love
    Contemporary Romance
    January 26
    c_neggers
    Carla Neggers
    The Spring at Moss Hill
    Swift River Valley series
    Contemporary Romance
    January 26



    c_redfearn
    Suzanne Refearn
    No Ordinary Life
    Mainstream
    February 2



    c_sherry
    Miranda Sherry
    Black Dog Summer
    February 10

    Mystery/Thriller/Suspense/Romantic Suspense
    m_depoy
    Phillip DePoy
    A Prisoner in Malta
    Mystery
    January 26
    m_donlea
    Charlie Donlea
    Summit Lake
    Suspense
    January 26



    m_eisler
    Barry Eisler
    The God’s Eye View
    Thriller
    February 2



    m_gardner
    Lisa Gardner
    Find Her
    Suspense
    February 9
    m_goodman
    Carol Goodman
    River Road
    Suspense
    January 19



    m_hart
    Megan Hart
    Little Secrets
    Suspense, Ebook
    February 2



    m_kennedy
    Elle Kennedy
    Midnight Revenge
    Killer Instincts series
    Romantic Suspense
    February 2
    ;m_khan
    Ausma Zehanat Khan
    The Language of Secrets
    Rachel Getty and Esa Khattak series
    Mystery
    February 2
    m_read
    Calia Read
    Unhinge
    Romantic Suspense
    January 12 
    m_robb
    J.D. Robb
    Brotherhood in Death
    In Death series
    Suspense
    February 2
    m_rose
    Karen Rose
    Alone in the Dark
    The Cincinnati series
    February 2

    Paranormal Romance/Science Fiction/Fantasy/Urban Fantasy
    p_bedford
    Jacey Bedford
    Winterwood
    Fantasy
    February 2



    p_brown
    Pierce Brown
    Morning Star
    Red Rising series
    Science Fiction
    February 9



    p_cerveny
    Catherine Cerveny
    The Rule of Luck
    Paranormal, Ebook
    January 26
    p_feehan
    Christine Feehan
    Spider Game
    GhostWalker series
    January 26
    p_galenorn
    Yasmine Galenorn
    Darkness Raging
    Otherworld series
    Urban Fantasy
    February 2
    p_shearin
    Lisa Shearin
    The Brimstone Deception
    SPI Files series
    Urban Fantasy
    January 26 
    p_snyder
    Maria V. Snyder
    Night Study
    New Poison Study series
    Fantasy
    January 26

    Young Adult
    ya_maxwell
    Lisa Maxwell
    Unhooked
    February 2

    Erotica
    e_beckett
    Sparrow Beckett
    To Have and to Master
    Masters Unleased series
    ebook
    January 19



    e_lauren
    Christina Lauren
    Wicked Sexy Liar
    Wild Seasons series
    February 2


    e_smith
    Lauren Smith
    Her Wicked Proposal
    League of Rogues series
    January 19

    Inspiration Romance/Mainstream
    i_cantrell (2)
    Julie Cantrell
    The Feather Bone
    January 26


    i_eason


    Lynette Eason
    Always Watching
    Elite Guardians series
    February 2



    i_gray

    Shelley Shepard Gray
    A Son's Vow
    The Charmed Amish Life series
    January 26


    i_warren
    Susan May Warren
    You’re the One That I Want
    Christiansen family series
    February 1



    kayKay is an avid reader of historical romance books, maybe with a little trip into paranormal land and an occasional journey into mystery world.
    by Norm | Jan 14, 2016
    by Genealogy Center | Jan 13, 2016
    bicentennialphotos

    Editor's Note:  This post originally appeared on the Genealogy Center blog on December 11, 2015.  Catch the latest genealogy news by adding their blog to your RSS feed.  Click here to view the original post.

    Do you live in Indiana? Have you ever resided in Indiana? Do you have family who once made Indiana their home? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you know someone who is a Hoosier.

    In celebration of the state’s bicentennial, The Genealogy Center invites Hoosiers to contribute images of “life lived in the small places” as that is what makes, and has made, Indiana great. We are interested in old and new images of daily life and the people of Indiana that showcase Hoosier life. These can include children at play, people at work, people hanging out, sporting events, homes and buildings, and so much more.

    The Genealogy Center will collect Who’s a Hoosier? images from December 11, 2015 through December 11, 2016 in honor of Indiana’s 200 years of statehood.

    To show your Hoosier pride, please contribute a picture along with a description of the image, detailing Who and What Makes Indiana Great!

    Upload pictures at Who's a Hoosier
    Email pictures to Genealogy@ACPL.Info
    Upload pictures to Facebook 
    Instagram @ GenealogyCenter
    by Becky | Jan 11, 2016
    Here’s a quick look at some books we’ve recently added to the collection. Something catch your eye? Click on a book cover to check availability — it’s as easy as that!

    If you’d like weekly updates on new additions to our collections, sign up for our New Arrivals newsletter by clicking here and following three easy steps. Warning: you may have to bring a couple of bookbags with you on your next visit!
    Moonshots
     Hubble
     Searching
     Human
     Stories
     Mission
     Coloring
     Total
     Universe

    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her thumb has no hint of green whatsoever but luckily her plants are forgiving. Her favorite books are The Shannara series by Terry Brooks.
    by Craig B | Jan 08, 2016

    image via SyndeticsAdele’s 25 finally hit the stores, broke some records (3.38 million copies sold in its first week, eat that N’Sync!), and continues to sit at number one on the Billboard 200.  It broke a record here at our small branch library, too.  We ordered 3 copies, something we never do, and we can’t keep them on the shelf.  I did, the other day, get a chance to listen to the album after waiting in line with my fellow library patrons and I can now say with some measure of authority that the album is good.  Always engaging with a sincerity of style that doesn’t come along every day, it has the most character near the end … like a face.  19, 21, and a record-breaking 25.  May Adele continue to age this well.

    Suggested Use: If your dance party at your parent’s house is going too late, this album is heartbreaking enough to kill the vibe and send everyone packing, even as they sing along to whatever track you’ve selected.  Your guests will probably even keep the party going as they get into their cars and make their mournful way home to the strains of their own copies of Adele’s 25 that lie ensconced in their dimly lit dashboards.



    craig Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by Becky C | Jan 04, 2016
    Allen County readers kept us busy in 2015!  ACPL circulated an average of 418,000 items per month and a strong percentage of those items were books.  Here's a quick look at our most popular checkouts.

    How many of these have you read?  Which books do you think should have made the Top 5?

    Adult Fiction

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     WYR5


    Adult Nonfiction

    WYR6
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     WYR8
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     WYR10


    Teen Fiction

    WYR11
     WYR12
     WYR13
     WYR14
     WYR15

    Teen Nonfiction

    WYR16
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     WYR18
     WYR19
     WYR20

    Children's Fiction

    WYR21
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     WYR25


    Children's Nonfiction

    WYR18
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     WYR20
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    WYR30
     


    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her thumb has no hint of green whatsoever but luckily her plants are forgiving. Her favorite books are The Shannara series by Terry Brooks.
    by Becky C | Jan 01, 2016
    When the snow finally arrives this winter, why not take the opportunity of a blustery day to check out the library's online resources?    All are free to Allen County resident cardholders.  Because our online resources automatically "return" themselves when the loan period has ended, there are no late fees.  Now if only our other materials could return themselves on time just as magically! 

    flipster
    Flipster is my personal favorite -- I love to read magazines but the most current copies are always checked out. Car & Driver, Consumer Reports, People, Rolling Stone, Sports Illustrated, and Time are just a few of the subscriptions available to ACPL residents.  When you read these magazines at an ACPL location (on your device or our computers), Flipster will allow you to read the magazines without entering your library card number.   

    To read outside the library you will have to sign in using your library card and  click on each magazine you’d like to read to open it in your browser. On iPads, you may also install the free Flipster app to download the magazine to read offline.  Once the loan period has ended, any magazine you have checked out will show “expired” in red and will no longer be accessible.   Access to Flipster is available via the ACPL website.
     
     freegal
     ACPL's subscription to Freegal allows Allen County residents to download five songs a week, every week -- the download limit resets Sundays at midnight.  These songs from the Sony catalog are available at no cost to you, and have no copying or playing restrictions.  Best of all, they are yours to keep forever.  Access Freegal by clicking here. Your login is your ACPL card number and PIN.
     
     Hoopla
    We've expanded our Hoopla subscription for 2016!!!  Previously we only had access to movies but beginning today we also have access to television show episodes, ebooks, music, comic books, and audiobooks.  Allen County residents may borrow up to 10 titles a month (regardless of format). Borrowed titles will return automatically once the circulation period has lapsed.  
    • Movies and TV show episodes may be borrowed for 72 hours.  Our patrons under the age of 18 may borrow movies rated G through PG-13. 
    • Ebooks, audiobooks, graphic novels, and comic books may be borrowed for 21 days.
    • Music (the full album) may be borrowed for 7 days.  Due to record label restrictions, hoopla allows individuals to borrow the same album only twice in a 30-day period.
    Hoopla requires a hoopla account you will set up with your ACPL card number, PIN, and an email address.  Login will be with your created hoopla account (email and password) at https://www.hoopladigital.com/ .
     
     mango
     

    Want to learn a new language?  Check out Mango -- with 60+ languages to choose from, there are plenty of options!  Each lesson combines real life situations and audio from native speakers.  The lessons are presented with an appreciation for cultural nuance and real-world application by focusing on the four key elements of language learning: vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar and culture.

    Look for Mango under RESEARCH on the ACPL website.  Mango also has a free app.  You can use the service as a guest, but, if you'd like to track your progress, you'll want to set up a free Mango account. 

     
     overdrive
    Did you receive an ereader over the holidays?  Check out Overdrive!  ACPL's subscription to Overdrive offers a variety of ebooks and downloadable audiobooks.  You can read or listen online with most titles and devices.  However, some titles and devices may require the OverDrive app or other software to work.  You can find help for your particular situation/device/setup here.   Checkout limit is 10; holds limit is 5.   Loan period is 21 days by default.





    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her thumb has no hint of green whatsoever but luckily her plants are forgiving. Her favorite books are The Shannara series by Terry Brooks.

     

     

     

    by Becky C | Dec 30, 2015
    The Reluctant GhostBook Review:  The Reluctant Ghost by Sheila Rosalynd Allen

    Jane Steadford is determined to save the only home her beloved aunt has ever known, Steadford Abbey.  Her uncle Nigel is equally determined to sell it and Charles Graham is equally determined to buy it.  Shenanigans ensue, not the least of which is Jane’s plan to convince Charles that the Abbey is haunted.  Little does she know that it actually is.  Sir Harry has been moping about the halls for years, gazing adoringly at Lady Agatha, but remaining unseen himself.  He’s never really understood his curse but he begins to as sparks begin to fly between Jane and Charles.

    Despite his late appearance, Sir Harry is the main character of this series.  He’s easily irritated, endearingly earnest, and completely intriguing.  Set in England in the 1800s, the plot is fun, even if the romance between Jane and Charles is cliched.  I first read this series years ago and decided to revisit it for a quick, fun read.

    Look to the next three books for more of Sir Harry and Lady Agatha’s backstories.   The Meddlesome Ghost, The Helpful Ghost, and The Passionate Ghost.


    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her thumb has no hint of green whatsoever but luckily her plants are forgiving. Her favorite books are The Shannara series by Terry Brooks.
    by Emily M | Dec 23, 2015
    Looking for a good book recommendation? Look no further!  Here are a few good books I’ve enjoyed recently.

    The Rosie Project: A Novel by Graeme Simsion

    rosieprojectDon Tillman is an exceptionally intelligent, yet socially stunted genetics professor who has decided he is in need of a wife. While taking up a scientific strategy to find the perfect wife, he meets a woman who is all wrong for him and, naturally, falls in love.  A remarkably enjoyable read that made me both laugh and cry, I highly recommend this book, particularly to fans of The Big Bang Theory.  (The resemblance between Don and Sheldon is strong.)

    Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout

    olivekitteridgeEach of the chapters of this novel function as short stories about the various townspeople of a little town in Maine, ultimately weaving the tale of Olive Kitteridge, a retired schoolteacher.  With so many chapters being told through the eyes of various characters, the reader is gifted with the ability to see Olive through many different perspectives – those who only know her peripherally, those who know her well, and her own.  Not one perspective shows Olive as being particularly likable or relatable, which makes her character remarkably believable and human.  While Olive has her redeeming moments, she is never redeemed.  Throughout the book, Elizabeth Strout writes painfully and exquisitely about the later years of life.

    The Time Traveler’s Guide to Medieval England: A Handbook for Visitors to the Fourteenth Century by Ian Mortimer

    timetravelersguideIf you’re a history buff who enjoys reading about wars and political intrigue, this is not the book for you.  But if you're intrigued with what daily life was like for your average Joe, The Time Traveler’s Guide to Medieval England will be right up your alley.  Ian Mortimer takes you on a journey to discover how people dressed and traveled, what they ate and drank, and what they did for work and entertainment in 14th century England. 



    What good books have read lately?


    EmilyLong before becoming a librarian, Emily was an avid library patron. She enjoys reading fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, biographies, and classic children’s literature. Her favorite book is Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery.

     

    by Craig B | Dec 18, 2015
    Star Wars Awoken3.jpgNote: Be sure to enter our Star Wars raffle made possible in part through donations from Books, Comics, & Things!  See end of post for more information.

    We did it!  The ACPL Blog Team saw the newest Star Wars film The Force Awakens!  See snapshots of our journey along that narrative rollercoaster below and follow the final link in this post to get our video response to the film.  Be cautious if you have not yet seen the film.  Our video could contain some unintended critical spoilers...


    T-Minus 23 minutes
    T-Minus 23 minutes

    T-Minus 17 minutes 
    T-Minus 17 minutes

    T-Minus 3 minutes
    T-Minus 3 minutes

    T-Minus ... nothing!
    T-Minus ... nothing!

    See our video response to Star Wars: The Force Awakens at the following link!

    https://youtu.be/s2u-vqzWaOw

    P.S. Look around for more Holiday 2015 Star Wars postings on ACPL social media.  Comment on any of those postings and earn an entry into our Star Wars raffle for each.  Limit 1 raffle entry per patron per post until Monday, December 28, 2015.  ACPL not responsible for lost or misdirected electronic submissions.  Raffle open only to Allen County residents with a valid email address.  And remember, share the Star Wars Christmas joy!  Share this post!

    Raffle Items
    by Craig B | Dec 16, 2015
    Kylo RenNote: Be sure to enter our Star Wars raffle made possible in part through donations from Books, Comics, & Things!  See end of post for more information.

    Well, folks, Star Wars: The Force Awakens is almost upon us.  Whether we await in blind ecstasy or crippling trepidation, we wait.  While we're waiting I thought we should talk about what we might be hoping for in our individual cases and what might come to us that could drive us over the edge ... I've compiled some of the results of my extensive survey of ACPL staff below:

    Evan
    Hope to see: More of Carrie Fisher than Harrison Ford ... but not counting on it
    Hope not to see: All 20,000 shots fired by professionally trained storm troopers miss every target

    Loren
    Hope to see: tons of fans complaining of lightsabers with cross-bars
    Hope not to see: anyone get their hand cut off ... again

    Staff Member A
    Hope to see: Luke Skywalker = Darksider
    Hope not to see: Elderly Jar-Jar Binks

    Karl
    Hope to see: Han Solo deliver great one-liners
    Hope not to see: Light/Lens flares. This is a J.J. Abrams movie and they tend to be plagued with light/lens flares.

    Craig
    Hope to see: Kylo Ren (see above image) Force choke someone by twitching his/her pinky
    Hope not to see: death of Luke Skywalker

    And ACPL patrons!  Add your own below in the comments!

    P.S. Keep an eye out for more Holiday 2015 Star Wars postings on ACPL social media (especially our highly anticipated video response due out December 19th).  Comment on any of those postings and earn an entry into our Star Wars raffle for each.  Limit 1 raffle entry per patron per post until Monday, December 28, 2015.  ACPL not responsible for lost or misdirected electronic submissions.  Raffle open only to Allen County residents with a valid email address.  And remember, share the Star Wars Christmas joy!  Share this post!

    Raffle Items



    craig Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by Becky C | Dec 14, 2015
    Here’s a quick look at some holiday favorites that you may have missed the first time around. Something catch your eye? Click on a book cover to check availability — it’s as easy as that!
    spending holidays
     awkward holiday photos
    holiday awesome
     
     festivus
     wcs holidays
     nothing with strings
       hot cider
     


    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her thumb has no hint of green whatsoever but luckily her plants are forgiving. Her favorite books are The Shannara series by Terry Brooks.