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My 2018 Reading Highlights

by Aisha H. | Jan 09, 2019

2018 saw me read a variety of things. While some people might not consider listening to audiobooks and looking at photography books a proper definition of reading, I still consider these as “books read” because they involved me hearing or seeing a story, analyzing what I heard and saw, and taking some part of the story into myself. Here are some of the books I read in 2018.

Audiobooks
I started listening to audiobooks years ago when I lived farther away from friends and family and would go on road trips. I kept listening to audiobooks because having someone read to me is a lovely experience.
 
 BornaCrime

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah     

I knew Noah from "The Daily Show" and love his accent, so listening to his memoir instead of reading it seemed like the right thing to do, and it was.

   
 LookAlive  

Look Alive Out There: Essays by Sloane Crosley

I’ve been a Sloane Crosley fan for years since reading her first book of essays, I Was Told There’d Be Cake. Standout essays included the one about her battles with her neighbor’s excessively cool teenagers and the one where she gets diagnosed with Ménière’s disease.

   
 YoullGrowOutofIt

You'll Grow Out of It by Jessi Klein

I definitely snorted when she talked about the way being called “ma’am” makes you feel, when up until that point, people called you “miss”.

   
   
 Fiction  
 TheHateUGive  

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

I’d be surprised if you hadn’t already heard of this book, but if you haven’t, it’s an amazing Young Adult novel that deals with the issue of race in America. Starr witnesses the police shooting of her unarmed friend Khalil and the two worlds she lives in, her poorer, predominantly black neighborhood and her wealthy, mostly white private school, clash as she tries to deal with the pressures her family and friends put on her.

   
 PastTense
Past Tense by Lee Child

This is the latest book in Lee Child's Jack Reacher series. I started reading the series back in November 2017. I hadn't thought of them as my kind of books (which goes to show you, we can all change), but I'd watched the film Jack Reacher: Never Go Back and decided to give them a shot. In a year, I read all 23 novels. (They took up a good chunk of my year.) Some of the standouts were One Shot (#9), Bad Luck and Trouble (#11), Worth Dying For (#15), and Make Me (#20). Oddly enough, Never Go Back (#18), the book that inspired the movie that got me reading the series was one of my least favorites. The book’s plot was a little different than the movie’s (or maybe more accurately, the movie’s plot was a little different than the book’s), and that might have thrown me off.
   
 ReincarnationBlues
Reincarnation Blues by Michael Poore

This novel is a mix of fantasy, historical fiction, romance, and science fiction. Milo has been reincarnated 9,995 times and has five more lives left in order to pursue perfection. He’s in love with Death (who prefers to be called “Suzie”), and if he doesn’t reach perfection, he’ll cease to exist and cease to be with Suzie. This book is funny, touching, and philosophical.
   
   
 Photography  
 DressLikeaWoman Dress Like a Woman: Working Women and What They Wore by Abrams Books

This collection of photographs uses clothing to explore the changes in women’s roles throughout the world. There are photos of famous women like Michelle Obama and Malala Yousafzai, but some of the more powerful, moving images are of everyday women.

   
 HowNYBreaksYourHeart

  How New York Breaks Your Heart by Bill Hayes

  These photographs of regular people doing regular
  things are intimate and impressive.



Aisha’s favorite authors are Lisa Lutz and Lorrie Moore. After years of resisting the librarian who owns a cat stereotype, she found Otis, the best giant little kitty ever created, and is now never without a cat hair somewhere on her clothing. 

  • Aisha’s favorite authors are Lisa Lutz and Lorrie Moore. After years of resisting the librarian who owns a cat stereotype, she found Otis, the best giant little kitty ever created, and is now never without a cat hair somewhere on her clothing.
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