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    by Emily M | Aug 17, 2018
    alexaemail2-3

    If you've been enjoying free audiobooks and music through Hoopla's website or app, there is now a brand new way to listen!  Amazon's Alexa can play Hoopla audiobooks and music on the Amazon Echo, Dot, Spot, and Show devices.  You will still need to visit the Hoopla website or app to check out new materials, but Alexa can provide information on what titles you have checked out and play your Hoopla music and audiobooks.

    If you've never tried Hoopla, now is a great time!  Hoopla allows digital downloads of movies, ebooks, audiobooks, and music.  All you need is an email address and your library card number to set up an account on Hoopla's website or app.

    Check out Alexa and Hoopla in action together below!




    EmilyLong before becoming a librarian, Emily was an avid library patron. She enjoys reading fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, biographies, and classic children’s literature. Her favorite book is Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery.

     

    by Kay S | Aug 15, 2018
    Yes, it's time for a few fiction upcoming releases coming to a library near you! These are not everything that is coming out - there just wouldn't be enough space for that. Hopefully some of these may be of interest to you.

    Historical Romance
     Tessa Dare Tessa Dare
    The Governess Game
    Girl Meets Duke series
    August 28
     Lorraine Heath Lorraine Heath
    When a Duke Loves a Woman
    Sins for All Seasons series
    August 21
     Sophia Jordan Sophie Jordan
    The Duke Buys a Bride
    The Rogue Files series
    July 24 - Yes, I missed it last month!
     caroline linden Caroline Linden
    An Earl Like You:
    The Wagers of Sin
    August 28

    Historical Fiction

     Pat Barker Pat Barker
    The Silence of the Girls
    August 30/September 11
     Kate Furnivall Kate Furnivall
    The Survivors
    September 6
     Douglas Jackson Douglas Jackson
    Hammer of Rome
    Gaius Valerius Verrens series
    September 6
     Andrew Miller Andrew Miller
    Now We Shall Be Entirely Free
    August 23

    Contemporary Romance/Mainstream/Women's Fiction/New Adult

     kenji jasper Kenji Jasper
    Nostrand Avenue
    Mainstream Fiction/suspense
    August 28 
     Beverly Jenkins Beverly Jenkins

    Second Time Sweeter
    Blessings series
    Contemporary romance
    August 28
     Christina Lauren Christina Lauren
    Josh and Hazel’s Guide to Not Dating
     Sharon Sala Sharon Sala
    Come Back to Me
    Blessings Georgia series
    Mainstream
    August 28
     Tiffany Warren Tiffany L Warren
    The Outside Child
    Mainstream fiction
    August 28
     Carl Weber Carl Weber  
    Influence
    Mainstream fiction
    August 28

    Mystery/Thriller/Suspense/Romantic Suspense

    Nancy Bush  Nancy Bush
    Jealousy
    Mystery
    August 28
     Vivien Chien Vivien Chien
     Dim Sum of All Fears
    Noodle Shop Mystery series
    Mystery
    August 28
     JT Ellison J. T. Ellison
    Tear Me Apart
    Sequel to Lie to Me
    Thriller
    August 28
     steve hamilton Steve Hamilton
    Dead Man Running
    Alex McKnight series
    Thriller
    August 21
     edwin hill Edwin Hill
    Little Comfort
    Hester Thursby Mystery series
    Mystery
    August 28
     sofie kelly Sofie Kelly
    The Cats Came Back
    Magical Cats Mystery series
    Mystery
    September 4
     Ward Larsen Ward Larsen
    Assassin's Run
    David Slaton series
    Thriller
    August 21
     karin slaughter Karin Slaughter
     Pieces of Her
    Thriller
    August 21

    Paranormal/Paranormal Romance/Science Fiction/Fantasy/Urban Fantasy/Horror

     Ilona Andrews Ilona Andrews
    Magic Triumphs
    Kate Daniels series
    Urban Fantasy
    August 28
     robert Jackson bennett Robert Jackson Bennett
     Foundryside
    Founders series
    Fantasy
    August 21
     FG Cottam F. G. Cottam
    The Lucifer Chord
    Horror
    September 1
     john alvide lindqvist John Aivide Lindqvist
    I Am Behind You
    Platerna series
    Horror
    August 23

    Young Adult/Teens

     Elly Blake Elly Blake
    Nightblood
    Frostblood Saga series
    August 21 
     Fischer Nancy Richardson Fischer
    When Elephants Fly
    September 4
     abbi glines Abbi Glines
    Losing the Field
    Field Party series
    August 21
     morgan rice Morgan Rice
    A Crown for Assassins
    Throne for Sisters series
    August 21

    Inspirational Romance/Mainstream Fiction

     colleen coble Colleen Coble
    Freedom's Light
    September 11
     roseanna white Roseanna M White
    An Hour Unspent
    Shadows Over England series
    September 4
     cindy woodsmall Cindy Woodsmall
    As the Tide Comes In
    August 21




    kayKay is an avid reader of historical romance books, maybe with a little trip into paranormal land and an occasional journey into mystery world.
    by Craig B | Aug 13, 2018

    cover selection from film, AdaptationBook Review: Alison Lurie's winner of the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Foreign Affairs

    The pun in Alison Lurie’s title of her 1985 Pulitzer Prize winner, Foreign Affairs, seems acceptable mostly because the rest of the book is restrained and full of insightful, character-driven complexities.  For example, “Is Fred Turner likeable?”  I mean, he seems like a nice guy, but then, it’s easy to be nice when no one has ever really told you “No.”  Also, there’s, “Vinnie Miner is a kleptomaniac.”  Yet we seem to be expected to sympathize with her.  Is that ok?  Perhaps I’m the victim of a gross misreading of the text (a bit like the time I misunderstood the point of The Graduate, thank you 500 Days of Summer), but I think we are supposed to sympathize with Vinnie … and her dog … at least, if we’re not, that’s a lot of pages to dedicate to a character that, well, I mean, is this The House of Yes, here?  At least we can say this about Vinnie; she doesn’t seem to steal from friends, just corporations, which, though they can often have a hard row to hoe are at least faceless.

    Speaking of faces, I was struck by the similarities between Alison Lurie and the character Vinnie Miner.  They share an interest in the teaching and writing of children’s literature as well as being immersed in academia.  Considering the kleptomaniac aspect, let’s hope that’s where the similarities stop, but of course that detail offers another chance for an “insightful complexity.”  Is my worry that Lurie is a kleptomaniac (and should never visit my home!) because she wrote herself into a kleptomaniac character actually an overinflated concern with dividing fiction from reality?  Aren’t all stories fiction on some level?  What I mean is that even if Lurie were to write her autobiography we would probably do well to take it with a grain of salt.  It’s probably been dramatized.  She’s human after all and we all remember things differently than others on a regular basis.  Who is to be believed?  And do we really want completely believable elements in our stories?  Most of our lives probably don’t feel as if they were scripted by Spielberg (though Lurie’s life might feel more that way than others).   Often, it’s more like our lives are scripted by Kaufman, and only the first 30 minutes of Adaptation.  Yup, the boring part.  And yet, if we look closely at our non-Spielberg lives (and the first 30 minutes of Adaptation) I feel certain we can learn something.  Or make something up.  Novelists have been doing it for years.

       

    Craig B author Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by Kayla W | Aug 10, 2018
    Movie Recommendation: Paprika


    ...the Internet and dreams are similar. They're areas where the repressed conscious mind escapes.  – Dr. Chiba


    Paprika

     

    Satoshi Kon is the late-great master of the imaginative. Through his body of work, it is apparent that the artist just as equally possessed the ability to bring across this sense of a stark, unfeeling reality, as well as never failing to show a staggering amount of well-honed creativity. I believe that Kon deserves to be remembered in the same breath as Haruki Murakami or Neil Gaiman, where the abnormal is treated as passé and what’s “normal” is treated as exotic. He was an artist that held a sense of underlying humanity – one that was prone to flights of the imaginative and some truly moving instances of empathy - which was, nevertheless, sometimes tempered by a shocking ruthlessness. To me, he could, like so many creators who are lauded as being ahead of their time, peer into some strange vision of the future. This is a trait he shares with some of his personal influences, such as Philip K. Dick and Terry Gilliam. He also happened to be one of those rare and thankfully more than talented enough artists who are not afraid to acknowledge the fourth wall separating fiction from reality - his characters from their audience - but was skilled in breaking it, as shown in his late work, Opus.

    On a personal note, this artist's widely differing and truly fantastic body of work is a lofty goal I aspire to one day live up to creating my own version of. Probably sounds silly, coming from someone with unfinished manuscripts to be comparing themselves to a master, but he is truly one of the great creators whom I am profoundly influenced by.

    To Kon, genre was a set of tropes and tools that he used freely and without any restraint, save for the choice of what is the absolute best one to use in that moment. As an audience member, his work will have you switching effortlessly and in a sophisticated manner between, say, the heavy feels of Millennium Actress to the nail-biting tension in the short film Magnetic Rose. Kon's work is still sometimes unbelievably hard to find (where are you in print, Paranoia Agent and Perfect Blue?), but all of his movies, books, as well as his single television series, are more than exceedingly worthy of being hunted for. I don't mean to bum you out unnecessarily. A good deal of his work is still in print, and I don't foresee a future where all of his work is going to wither into obscurity.

    I can comfortably say that if Kon could have chosen something to do the proverbial mic drop on, he could have done a lot worse than this film. Paprika is a thesis statement to what were his obsessions as a creator, a volatile but somehow immaculate tempering of childlike wonder with chilling, abruptly shocking coldness, as well as a flagrant disregard for a supposed line between reality and imagination. It’s magical realism with a heavy kick to the abdomen of “realism”.  

    Paprika is bright, colorful, and demented one moment, then moody, slow, and emotional the next. It's intelligent, engaging, and is astoundingly "mature", in the sense that it requires the full engagement of its audience and rewards it. The film is the work of a master at the height of his ability, one with a deep and profound understanding of pacing, mood, and the knowledge of just how far to push boundaries. Kon (and I would be remiss to not also cite the legendary Madhouse animation studio who crafted it) took what I can best describe as a proto Inception story (but better) and with a lot of the moody noir reminiscent of Blade Runner, injecting it with personality and color to spare.

    It’s an experience, like all of his filmography, that truly must be seen to give justice to it, but the plot could best be summarized as followed:

    A team of research psychologists use a special, prototype technology which enables them to interact with patients through dreams. Following me on this?

    One of these experimental psychologists, Dr. Chiba, illegally uses a "borrowed" set of the device in order to provide therapy to clients. During these deep dives into their subconscious, she takes on the persona of Paprika in her clients' dreams, transforming her into a carefree, younger woman. As Paprika, Dr. Chiba is able to identify what her clients’ deeply embedded problems are, and for a while things are great. However, although the doctor has good intentions by using the device she sneaks out in order to perform this therapy, there are terrible consequences when one device is stolen by a thief who uses the still prototypical interface to hack into people’s dreams: including the clients that Dr. Chiba had been trying to help.

    The film becomes a unique mix of noir thriller, magical realism, and psychological science fiction, full of beautiful and compelling concepts that can make something as silly as a parade seem uncontrollably sinister, and presents many things which are not what they first appear – and require multiple movie viewings to truly grasp the reality of.

    Although it is based off of a book, I haven’t had the chance to read it myself, so I cannot attest to its quality in comparison to the movie that it became the basis for. What I can vouch for is that this is a truly great film that is more than worth your time.  And if you ever happen to find his short movie collection, Memories, watch it immediately.

    Kayla loves all things weird, wonderful, and macabre.  Her soul’s in writing, and her hobbies include gaming, watching movies and television shows, reading anything and everything. Her black cat’s TOTALLY, 100%, not evil.

    by Mindy L | Aug 08, 2018

    Some books sit on your nightstand for weeks as you read a little bit each night. These are not those books.

    The High Tide Club by Mary Kay Andrews

    The High Tide ClubNinety-nine-year-old heiress Josephine Bettendorf Warrick summons attorney Brooke Trappnell to Talisa Island.  Over a few meetings, the ailing Josephine spins a tale of old friendships, secrets, betrayal, and a long-unsolved murder. She wants Brooke to help save her island from developers -- and to find her three best friends from her youth so that she can make amends to them.

    This is a much darker book than many of Andrews' others. It reads well and the characters are interesting and well-drawn. Several times the Kleenexes were needed.

    9 Kittehs  cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji



    Fiction Can Be Murder by Becky Clark

    Fiction Can Be MurderMystery author Charlemagne "Charlee" Russo thinks the twisty plots and peculiar murders in her books are only the product of her imagination - until her agent is found dead exactly as described in Charlee's new, unpublished manuscript. Naturally Charlee becomes the prime suspect. Mostly a cozy with a bit of grit, this is a nice quick read for a summer evening.

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    Medusa Uploaded
    by Emily Devenport

    Medusa UploadedA fast-paced science fiction thriller about the limits of power and control, and the knife-edge distinction between killing for revenge or for a greater good.  Oichi’s voice is exceptional -- it's conversational, funny, and tragic. She, along with the Executives and the servants, has to overcome inherent bias to uncover the devastating plot that could destroy their starship.

    I'm looking forward to the next book in the series!

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    Crime & Punctuation
    by Kaitlyn Dunnett

    Crime and PunctuationMikki Lincoln, newly widowed, moves back to her childhood home (now a fixer-upper), and becomes a freelance editor. Lenape Hollow is not the thriving tourist destination it was decades ago. Not with a murderer on the loose . . .

    Murder, conspiracies, and editing. Mikki’s a fun character, not a gauche 25 year-old. She’s tough and funny and works hard to find out who dunnit.  I look forward to more in the series.

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    In the Valley of the Devil
    by Hank Early 
     

    In the Valley of the DevilI don’t usually post reviews of books I didn’t like but I'm going to make an exception here.  The first book in the series, Heaven's Crooked Finger, was hard to put down. Racism, religion, romance, mysticism, family drama:  it had it all and I was really looking forward to the sequel.

    Those same ingredients are still in the mix in the sequel but somehow nothing jelled this time.  I found myself getting progressively annoyed with the main character, Earl Marcus. How many times do you have to make the same mistake -- how many times do you have to get beat up, cut up, or shot, before you get a clue? I think the author may have been under pressure to get the second book out. The whole book was basically a fugue of the same thing happening to Earl. Over and over.

    Maybe the third book will get the bugs worked out (I am usually willing to give the author a second or third chance).

    5 Kittehs cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji


    *Cat emoji images via freepik

    Another month, another cat pic:  Ursula aka VOC (very old cat) is taking a nap.  She's over 20 years old.

    VOC

    Mindy works at the Little Turtle branch.  She's a cat lady, an avid reader, and an old boomer.

    by Becky C | Aug 06, 2018
    Recently ordered dvds now show up in the catalog sooner -- which means you can place them on hold sooner!   This post is only a sneak peek at some of the titles ACPL has added to its shelves this month; there are many more titles heading to the shelves soon. Click here to see a comprehensive list of dvds currently on order (entertainment, informational, kids, etc.)

    All descriptions are taken from our catalog summaries.

     Isle of Dogs   The Isle of Dogs
    Comedy; MPAA rating: PG-13

    When all the canine pets of Megasaki City are exiled to a vast Trash Island, 12-year-old Atari Kobayashi embarks on an epic journey in search of his bodyguard-dog, Spots. 
         
     A Quiet Place    A Quiet Place
    Horror; MPAA rating: PG-13

    In a post-apocalyptic world, a family is forced to live in silence while hiding from monsters with ultra-sensitive hearing.  Can they escape?  Has their time run out?

         
     Journeys End    Journey's End
    War; MPAA rating: R

    The Great War, March 1918. C-company arrives to take its turn in the front-line trenches of northern France, led by the war-weary Captain Stanhope. With a German offensive imminently approaching, the company anxiously awaits their unknown fate.
         
     Mosaic   Mosaic
    Mystery; TVMA CHV rating: 14A.

    The story focuses on the brutal New Year's Eve disappearance of a high-profile resident of picturesque Summit, Utah, and the four-year effort of law-enforcement officers and civilians to arrive at the truth behind the crime.
         
     Submission    Submission
    Drama; MPAA rating: R

    A cynical college professor takes a keen interest in a talented young writing student. When lines are crossed, it becomes unclear who is the victim and who is the victimizer.

         
     Sweet Country    Sweet Country
    Drama; Rating: R

    Sam works for a preacher in the outback of Australia's Northern Territory. When Harry, a bitter war veteran, moves into a neighboring outpost, the preacher sends Sam and his family to help Harry renovate his cattle yards. The relationship quickly deteriorates, culminating in a violent shootout.
         
     211    211
    Action; Rating: R

    Inspired by one of the longest and bloodiest real-life events in police history. Officer Mike Chandler and a young civilian passenger find themselves under-prepared and outgunned when fate puts them squarely in the crosshairs of a daring bank heist in progress.



    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman..
    by Evan | Aug 03, 2018
    Bloody ShirtSometimes I read books because I should read them, even if I don't immediately want to. They're like eating unseasoned vegetables -- nourishing but possibly bitter. Still, I do feel enriched after finishing them, and before long I will choose another one.

    The broccoli in my CD player this month is The Bloody Shirt: Terror after Appomattox by Stephen Budiansky. Actually, it's a pretty interesting read, but the subject matter -- how the Ku Klux Klan and its supporters won the peace after the Civil War -- is so dispiriting that I have to take it in doses.

    Most of the book tells the stories of several individuals who tried to make Reconstruction work -- tried to give black Americans equal rights in the South. They displayed a lot of courage, but it turned out the Confederacy was not the only Lost Cause.

    Racism pervades time and space in our country. (In fact, we are getting a new book about how black settlers were abused in Indiana and the rest of the Old Northwest. The title of Anna-Lisa Cox's work is The Bone and Sinew of the Land: America's Forgotten Black Pioneers and the Struggle for Equality.) But powerful 19th century Southern whites celebrated their racism, made it the bedrock of their society -- and millions of people have suffered accordingly. 

    One of the buzz terms in my own social circles is "white privilege." It's a bitter morsel indeed -- hard for a lot of people to swallow in today's time of supposed equal opportunity. But when you work through something like The Bloody Shirt, you can see how racism is down but not out. 

    Anyway, reading for fun is great stuff, but I hope people will also use the library to read about the problems of our world -- be they social, moral, environmental or otherwise. Hey, a few months ago I even listened to the autobiography of a politician for whom I had no love. I still don't love him very much, but at least I can better understand him.


    EvanEvan - Married, three children, two grandchildren, formerly a newspaper journalist, now a public librarian, at all times a board game nut.
    by Craig B | Aug 01, 2018

    cover for Bebe Rexha's album, ExpectationsThis debut album, Expectations, from Rexha has some delightful self-discountenancing / awareness (such as these lines from "I’m a Mess," “Everything's gonna be alright / Everything's gonna be OK / It's gonna be a good, good life / That's what my therapist say”) and Rexha did kind of break my heart with "Grace" (pun intended; listen to the song, it will all come clear) near the end of the album, but I wish I could have squared some of the lyrics from that song with the song following it, "Pillow."  I mean, if you’re lonely and hugging your ‘pillow’ maybe you should have stuck with that near perfect guy from "Grac …" ahh, I don’t know.  We’re all a bit of a mess aren’t we?

    Suggested Use: Need some music to help you get back up to speed on “adult-ing” in your day-to-day life?  The pop lightheartedness of Rexha’s album combined with its semi-world-weary outlook typical of many in their late 20’s should help get you out of bed, schedule that dentist appointment, and/or budget the increase in your monthly commitment to your 401(k) you’ve been putting off.  I know, it’s tough to make good on the promised freedoms of adulthood when you realize most of what your parents spent their time doing involved checking boxes on organizational forms, but it will all seem a little better after a track or two from Expectations and that first cup of coffee, I promise.  If not, if I’m wrong, I do apologize for promoting a misshapen set of “expectations.”


    craig Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by Becky C | Jul 30, 2018
    Readers Advisory

    One of my favorite types of questions at the reference desk involves investigating what book a person is looking for when they only remember a few details -- the type of book, a general outline, maybe a character's name.  Cover details can also be helpful.  Between the wealth of online resources available, the fact that I personally read a lot, and the fact that I'm acquainted with a lot of people who read a lot, it's rare to not be able to match the remembered details to the book.  It's not always a fast discovery -- the fewer the details, the longer it tends to take.  There are instances, however, when even a wealth of remembered details do not lead to an immediate answer.  

    Recently, I decided to put my readers' advisory skills to the test.  There are a few books that I read as a teenager back in the 1980s that I remember better than books I read just last year.  I'm not referring to the required reading in English class, either, although I can still feel my heart's reaction to the The Pigman by Paul Zindel.  I'm referring to the mass market paperbacks that I could typically finish in an afternoon. 

    One book I remember particularly well was about a girl named Marnie and a boy named Lucas.  While their parents were friends, they were not.  When the story began, they lived in a city.  Then, both sets of parents decided that it would be best to move to the country, together.  They buy a farm and share a house.  Marnie is devastated -- at first.  But somewhere along the way, she discovers that she has feelings for Lucas.  Given their prior antagonistic relationship, this is awkward.  She pretends to knit a sweater for herself, but deliberately sizes it to him, so that the obvious thing to do is to give it to him.

    That's a fair amount of detail, right?  I even vaguely remembered the cover of the book -- I remembered that the girl was a brunette and the guy was blond.  But I could not remember the title or the author.  So, I approached it the way I would any other question like this one.  I first tried keyword searches -- many library and bookstore records include basic summaries.  No luck. No luck with NoveList either.

    Next, I turned to my good friend, Google.  I began with a Google image search for 1980s "teen romance" "book covers"; I saw many covers I remembered, but not the one I was looking for.  I created a keyword search for "1980s teen romance fiction" and received several results.  Goodreads has a Teen Romance of the 1980s list and I scanned it first.  I clicked a few titles that seemed promising but didn't find a match.  If I had scanned the Goodreads list for Out of Print '80s Teen Series, I would have found my book, but I passed that list by -- and I'm glad I did.  Why?  Because my longer search led me to discover an amazing blog called Cliquey Pizza.  It hasn't been updated since 2014, but its posts live on, and if you are interested in teen fiction from the 1980s, it's a treasure trove of information.  The blogger evidently loved teen fiction and wrote a series of detailed posts focusing on the popular series from that decade. 

    While scrolling down a  post published on February 5, 2010, titled 80's Wildfire Teen Romances, I saw it.  The cover featured a blond guy in a flannel shirt with his arms around a brunette in a country-western shirt.  I remember wishing that guy would enroll in my high school -- and since I'm a brunette, it was easy to picture myself as the girl on the cover. And, if there was any doubt that this was The One, it was erased the minute I read the description the blogger had included:  

    An April Love StoryToday,” My father announced, “I bought a farm in North Carolina. We’re leaving the city, Marnie.  We’re going back to the land.” Back to the land?  Leaving the city? Marnie Macdonald can’t believe her ears, her parents must be kidding. Worse, they’re going with the Petersons…sharing a house with them. And Marnie can’t stand their son Lucas. At first. But by April, when the MacDonalds and Peterson’s have lived and worked together for almost a year, Marnie finds herself head-over-heels in love with Lucas! Now if Lucas would only notice.

    The book in question is An April Love Story by Caroline B. Cooney.  We don't have a print copy in the system but it's available online via Hoopla.  Like my teenage self, I read it in an afternoon, and I'm pleased to say that it has stood the test of time.  I loved it then and I love it now. 

    What about you?  Are there books you have fond memories of but you just can't recall the title or the author?

    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman..
    by Becky C | Jul 27, 2018
    Ever wonder what library staff like to read?  Wonder no more!  Here's a quick look at some books we've enjoyed this month.  Click on a book cover to read a summary and check availability — it’s as easy as that!

    General Fiction
    How to Walk Away  Florida   How to Paint a Dead Man
     One Less Problem Without You  The Ninth Hour  House Rules
     The Chilbury Ladies Choir  The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society  Frankenstein
     The Goldfinch  Tell the Machine Goodnight  


    Horror
    The Outsider    

    Mystery/Suspense

     End Game Ill Will   The Woman in the Window
     A Taste for Vengeance  The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie  


    Romance
    In His Hands  Love and Other Words  

    Science Fiction/Fantasy

    The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy  Ashes  Persepolis Rising
     Ka  Ivory and Bone  Mistborn
     All Systems Red  Artificial Condition  


    Young Adult
    The Poet X Children of Blood and Bone   My Plain Jane

    Children's

    Adventure According to Humphrey  Paddington Bear in the Garden   


    Graphic Novels
    My Boyfriend Is A Bear  Nimona   

    Want more recommendations?  Click here for previous What We're Reading posts. 

    Please let us know what books you've been reading that you've really enjoyed.  We're always looking for our next great read!

    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman..
    by Becky C | Jul 27, 2018
    Ever wonder what library staff like to read?  Wonder no more!  Here's a quick look at some books we've enjoyed this month.  Click on a book cover to read a summary and check availability — it’s as easy as that!

     Best Cook in the World  The Boys in the Boat  Look Alive Out There
     Midnight in Peking  The Jesuit Guide to Almost Everything  How to Change Your Mind
     Spook  The Order of Time  Calypso
       The Glass Castle  


    Want more recommendations?  Click here for previous What We're Reading posts. 

    Please let us know what books you've been reading that you've really enjoyed.  We're always looking for our next great read!

    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman..
    by Emily M | Jul 25, 2018

    Looking for a book recommendation?  Look no further!  Here are a few good books I've enjoyed lately...

    lifeafterlifeLife After Life by Kate Atkinson

    In February of 1910 a woman goes into labor.  The doctor is unable to get through the raging snowstorm and she is attended only by a 14-year-old kitchen maid with no experience assisting in childbirth.  The umbilical cord wraps around the baby’s neck and the baby dies. 

    No, wait.  Let’s try again. 

    In February of 1910 a woman goes into labor.  Despite a raging snowstorm the doctor arrives just in time to cut the umbilical cord from around the baby’s neck.  Little Ursula Todd will live.  So begins the story of what could have been and what could be. 

    Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life is a fascinating and unusual story.  Have you ever wondered how different your life would have been if just one variable had been different?  Have you ever wondered how all of human history may have been different due to just one small change? Life After Life explores these questions through the life of Ursula Todd, born in 1910 to an upper-middle class family in Great Britain.  Over and over again, Atkinson starts Ursula’s story from the beginning.  First, she dies at birth.  Then, she survives her birth, only to drown in the sea.  Then, she survives a near drowning to fall off a roof.  Initially, it seems the author is exploring all the way Ursula could die, but the more one reads the more evident it becomes that the author is exploring all of the different lives Ursula could live. 

    The unusual format of this book is not for everyone.  You won’t find clear-cut answers and a definitive ending, but Life After Life has much to offer.  In addition to exploring all the different directions a life can go, it delves into the bonds of familial love and exposes the realities of life in Great Britain during World War I and World War II.

     

    sonsandsoldiersSons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of the Jews who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the US Army to Fight Hitler by Bruce Henderson

    When Hitler came to power in Germany in 1933, it quickly became apparent to Jewish Germans that it would be best if they left the country.  Sons and Soldiers is the story of six young Jewish men who were lucky enough to escape Germany and make it to the United States.  When the United States entered World War II, they were understandably eager to join up and fight Hitler and the Nazis.  Initially rejected by the US army for their “enemy alien” status, these young men would eventually be drafted for non-combat duty, before being selected for a top-secret army intelligence program.  With their fluent German and intimate knowledge of German culture, they were the perfect candidates to be trained in the interrogation of German prisoners of war.  Following the stories of these six young men from childhood to the end of the war, Henderson’s narrative nonfiction is a gripping tale of six Jewish men who, against all odds, not only survived Hitler’s mass genocide, but played a key role in defeating him.

     

    callmeamericanCall Me American: A Memoir by Abdi Nor Iftin

    Call Me American is the story of an immigrant.  It is the story of a boy whose child- and young adult-hood were spent in a war zone.  It is the story of a teenager who fell in love with American movies and music, who idolized Michael Jackson and Arnold Schwarzenegger, and who taught himself English.  It is a story of a young man who refused the only two options available to young men in his city: become a Muslim sheikh or join the army.  It is the story of a brave man who made contact with a Western journalist and risked his life to share his story with NPR.  It is the story of a desperate refugee trying to gain entrance to the United States.  It is the story of a man who is supported by Americans who care about him, but is still struggling to adjust to a new country and culture.  Abdi’s story is fascinating and heart-breaking, and if you want to understand the political situation in Somalia, how it developed and why the violence persists, read this book.



    What about you?  What good books have you read lately?


    EmilyLong before becoming a librarian, Emily was an avid library patron. She enjoys reading fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, biographies, and classic children’s literature. Her favorite book is Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery.

     

    by Kayla W | Jul 20, 2018

    Manga Recommendation: Princess Jellyfish

    Terrifyingly enough… there’s a male princess in Tokyo.  A strong, beautiful male princess. – Tsukimi Kurashita

     

    Princess Jellyfish

     

    Although it hurts my heart, because I will miss the adventures of the Amars, I am at the last (ninth) volume of this series. For anyone who’s read and has fallen in love with this manga, it’s an easy thing to understand. After all, it’s a great series that has a lighthearted tone and an actual ending that is within believable reaching distance (unlike so many that NEVER seem to end and outstay their welcome!).  

    Although I am sad to be getting ready to say good-bye, I was happy to spend my time with such an upbeat, adorable story. Especially one that features grown women who love who they are and aren’t ashamed of their hobbies and passions.

    This manga is a cute and strangely sober look at the minds of both shut-in fangirl culture as well as haute couture fashion.  It’s a dramedy about a house full of women united in their absolute devotion to their individual fandoms, hobbies, and bizarre behavior.

    It has a cast mostly made up of female characters who have chosen a self-exile to focus on their eccentricities and dreams. Calling themselves Amars (nuns), instead of living in squalor, or at the mercy of family members like spinsters of old, they have come together to live in an aging estate, which has become a communal gilded cage.  Together, they ignore an outside world that has shunned them (in real or imagined ways), with the occasional interaction that they have outside of the house literally turning them to stone when approached by people they’re unfamiliar with!  But, above all, they’re trying to do everything in their powers to avoid a potential run-in with the most dreaded class of people of all.

    The Stylish

    The youngest and most approachable of the Amars, Tsukimi, is much like her Amars’ sisters in most ways, with her own fixation resting almost entirely on jellyfish. Yes, jellyfish.  She draws them, daydreams of them, and retains fond memories of a mother she lost, the fondest of all memories being ones spent visiting an aquarium where she first became enamored with the unlikeliest of creatures. 

    Her life changes with a split decision Tsukimi makes in order to rescue a jellyfish that would otherwise die.  It leads to her teaming up with a Stylish.  It’s not long before she discovers that not only is this beautiful woman dead set on situating herself firmly into Tsukimi’s life (and that of the rest of the Amars’), but that she’s more than make-up and perfect clothing.  To be exact, “she” is a young man who loves to dress as a woman.

    The clash of values, culture, wealth, and identities leads to a fascinating story, with make-overs and rabid attempts to save the Amars’ home from being demolished, working in tandem with a journey through the invention of a new focus in Japanese fashion.  It’s… *Deep breath*   Jellyfish.  No, really.

    Although I usually enjoy a good romance plot (especially the stranger and less logical it seems), I must admit that, to me, the love triangle that this manga insists on centering on is actually by far the weakest aspect of the series’ story.  However, among a sea of truly eye-rolling romance plots in mangas, Princess Jellyfish comes off surprisingly clean and light, in comparison to its cliché-riddled competition. Where the manga truly shows how special it is, however, is with its gentle depiction of its characters, not only poking fun at their more absurd behavior and fixations, but offering reasons why they do what they do and showing how they’re more than capable of overcoming odds stacked against them in wonderful and inventive ways.

    Indeed, what ultimately elevates this story is how it playfully pokes at these damaged characters, taking genuine joy in revealing the – Princess or Prince – beneath the surface of every worthy character, the humor never turning into excuses to punch down on these people for their strangeness or supposed defects.  The “makeovers” seem to be more indicative of a physical manifestation of a deeper possible change, a potential that’s there, if only it can be grasped. And I think that’s beautiful.

    A true disappointment is that the short-lived anime series based off of the manga was ultimately cancelled really early in the series’ story arc.  I believe it is still worth watching – the comedic timing and all of the heart of the manga is there, even though it was cancelled after a pretty big cliff hanger.  One thing I am hopeful for is that the next brand-spankin-new series that Higashimura has made, Tokyo Tarareba Girls, will offer a lot of the same heart and humor that this one has in spades.

    Kayla loves all things weird, wonderful, and macabre.  Her soul’s in writing, and her hobbies include gaming, watching movies and television shows, reading anything and everything. Her black cat’s TOTALLY, 100%, not evil.

    by Craig B | Jul 18, 2018

    cover for William Kennedy's novel, IronweedBook Review: William Kennedy's winner of the 1984 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Ironweed

    Suicide is a recurring theme in William Kennedy’s novel, Ironweed, though Kennedy makes it clear from the very beginning, that his central metaphor of a flowering plant named for the “toughness of its stem” pretty much takes suicide off the table for his main character, Francis Phelan.  We begin following Phelan from just getting out of jail for accepting money to register to vote multiple times (21 in all) to a midnight raid on The Jungle; Albany, New York’s 1930’s hobo settlement.  In Francis Phelan, we are introduced to a complicated character that, despite his misdeeds, we mostly end up cheering on, though if I were in his daughter, Peg’s shoes, or even those of his son, Billy’s, I’m not sure I could.  But then, what has one to gain from unforgiveness when forgiveness could make a broken family whole again?  If only hindsight was more current!

    Speaking of which, the title of this post is not mine.  That first part is a cliché and the second part comes from Kennedy himself.  Kennedy’s phrase for me is a good example of the pith and vigor of his prose and the environment it brings to life (pun intended … keep reading you’ll see) with its inclusion of dreams, destitution, and actual ghosts (ha!).  Simultaneously hard-edged and fantastic, the story is often energized by the juxtaposition of terse language and composed, dreamy forays into the spiritual world, all to say, yeah, the man, Kennedy, can write.

    Kennedy’s life as writer began with a glowingly serendipitous event for all the bleakness of this novel.  Born in Albany, New York, he met his mentor-to-be, Saul Bellow, in, no, not New York, in Puerto Rico, and received encouragement to become a writer of novels.  I mean, speaking of fantasies, I’ve had one of sitting in Le Creuset in Nashville, making a profound impression on Nicole Kidman when she came in to buy some cast iron kitchen ware and receiving encouragement from that muse of many herself, but, as my friend pointed out, that would never happen.  Nicole would never visit Le Creuset; she has someone who does that kind of stuff for her.

    Anyway, this is a small novel (for which I was grateful) about a smallish place that looms large in my experience because of Kennedy’s artistry.  The novel, of course, reflects the world around it; a world small enough for Bellow to be met by a burgeoning writer in Puerto Rico, but a world also enlarged by the incorrigible serendipity of such an event.  Not to mention the ghosts.  I haven’t seen any lately but Kennedy’s novel is full of them which makes the 227 pager vast despite itself.  A world full of the dead begets infinity, I mean, because, well, they got all the eyes.

      

    Craig B author Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by Evan | Jul 11, 2018

    We have a big collection of books and other items at our library, but we don't buy everything published. Inevitably, people want to borrow items that we don't own. Oftentimes, we can borrow books from other library systems, but sometimes that's not the best option. And we don't borrow electronic items, such as ebooks or even CDs and DVDs. 

    To deal with such situations, there is a Purchase Request tab on the My Account button at the top of our home page. If you click on My Account, input your library card number and your PIN, you will see the tab as one of your options. Click on that and fill out the brief form shown here. 

    Title:
    Author:
    Format (ex BOOK, DVD):
    Pub. Info:
    ISBN/ISSN:
    Note:
    EMAIL:

     

    If you have all the information requested, that's great, but we mainly need the title, author and format. You are encouraged to include your email address in case we need to get in touch with you, but there is not a notification system to tell what decision was made. We ask that after you make a request that you wait a couple of weeks to check the catalog to see whether the item has been ordered. 

    Requests are limited to three per month, and not every request will be filled.  As a rule, for instance, we do not purchase highly specialized or academic material. But if you do know of something you think we should have, fill in that form and we'll look into it. And thanks for your interest in our library collection.



    EvanEvan - Married, three children, two grandchildren, formerly a newspaper journalist, now a public librarian, at all times a board game nut.
    by Kay S | Jul 06, 2018
    Yes, it's time once again for a few select books which may help you cool down for the summer. These books are due to be released between July 14 and August 14, 2018. As always, please remember that is the publishing date, not the date they might appear on your library shelf.

    Historical Romance
    Eloisa James  Eloisa James

    Born to Be Wilde
    The Wildes of Lindow Castle series
    July 31
     Jane Ashford Jane Ashford

    Brave New Earl
    The Way to a Lord's Heart series
    August 7
     Karen Ranney Karen Ranney

    To Love a Duchess
    All For Love Novel series
    July 31
     Mia Marlowe Mia Marlowe

    The Singular Mr. Sinclair
    House of Lovell series
    July 17

    Historical Fiction

     Brooks Karen Brooks

    The Locksmith’s Daughter
    U.S. release date
    July 31 
     MJ rose M.J. Rose

    Tiffany Blues
    August 7

    Contemporary Romance/Mainstream Fiction/New Adult, Women's Fiction

    Belle Andre Bella Andre

    Every Time We Fall In Love
    The Sullivans series
    Contemporary Romance
    July 18
    Alyssa Cole Alyssa Cole

    A Duke by Default
    Reluctant dukes series
    Contemporary Romance
    July 31
    jonah jonasson Jonas Jonasson

    The Accidental Further Adventures of the Hundred-Year-Old Man
    Sequel The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared
    Mainstream fiction
    August 9
    Debbie Maccomber Debbie Macomber

    Cottage by the Sea
    Contemporary Romance
    July 17
    louise miller Louise Miller

    The Late Bloomers' Club
    Mainstream fiction
    July 17
    laura trentham Laura Trentham

    Set the Night on Fire
    Cottonbloom series
    Contemporary romance
    July 31

    Mystery/Thriller/Suspense/Romantic Suspense

    Aaron Elkins  Aaron Elkins

    A Long Time Coming
    Mystery
    August 7
     Susanna Gregory Susanna Gregory

    Intrigue in Covent Garden  
    Thomas Chaloner series
    Mystery
    August 2
     Jeri Westerson Jeri Westerson

    The Deepest Grave
    Crispin Guest Medieval Noir series
    Mystery
    August 1

    Paranormal Romance/Urban Fantasy/Fantasy/Science Fiction/Horror

    Heather Graham  Heather Graham
     
    Pale as Death
    Krewe of Hunters series
    Paranormal thriller
    August 1
     Kevin hearne Kevin Hearne

    Delilah Dawson

    Kill the Farm Boy
    The Tales of Pell series
    Fantasy
    July 17
     Lee Martinez A Lee Martinez

    Constance Verity Saves the World
    Adventure of Constance Verity series
    Urban Fantasy
    July 17
     Seanan McGuire Seanan McGuire

    The Girl in the Green Silk Gown
    Ghosts Roads series,
    Urban Fantasy
    July 17

    Young Adult/Teen

    Ann Aguirre  Ann Aguirre

    Like Never and Always
    July 17 
     Oliver Potzsch Oliver Potzsch

    Sword of Power
    Black Musketeer series
    July 24
     Chloe Seager Chloe Seager

    Friendship Fails of Emma Nash
    Emma Nash series
    August 9

    Inspirational Romance/Mainstream Fiction

    Shelley Gray  Shelley Shepard Gray
     
    Her Fear
    The Amish of Hart County series
    July 24
     Marta Perry Marta Perry

    Shattered Silence
    Echo Falls series
    August 1




    kayKay is an avid reader of historical romance books, maybe with a little trip into paranormal land and an occasional journey into mystery world.
    by Mindy L | Jul 04, 2018

    Some books sit on your nightstand for weeks as you read a little bit each night. These are not those books.

    What Should Be WildWhat Should Be Wild by Julia Fine

    Maisie Cothay has a problem: She can't be touched and she can’t touch anyone.  Her touch kills and resurrects, there's no in-between.  She lives in an old manor near a fearsome wood which the villagers warn against entering. When her father disappears, she has to break out of a lifetime of training as she searches for him. This novel features strange immortal women and time that moves at a different pace. Written in an old-fashioned, formal style, it's an odd but rewarding coming-of- age fairy tale. 8 ½ Kittehs. cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji



    A Howl of WolvesA Howl of Wolves
    by Judith Flanders

    Sam is an amusing book editor in London who somehow gets involved in some interesting murders.  This is the fourth book in the Sam Clair series and I’m always happy to see a new one. Fast read, not heavy on social commentary, offering a window on the publishing industry. 8 Kittehs cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji



    The Dark AngelDark Angel
    by Elly Griffiths

    A new offering in the Ruth Galloway Mystery series! Ruth, an archeologist with a daughter fathered by DCI Nelson (a married police officer) has plenty on her plate. Her paramour’s wife is pregnant (no one is quite sure who the father is, either Nelson or another policeman) and all the relationships are fraught. This sounds like a book revolving around sex! It’s not. Ruth takes an unplanned vacation in Italy to help an old friend with an archeological mystery. Earthquakes, murders, bad things happening back in England, and a particularly wrenching ending kept me up too late.  There are many characters with storylines going in all directions. They’re worth the effort although most readers will want to start at the beginning of the series.  10 ½ kittehs. cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji



    Dead PrettyDead Pretty by David Mark

    In this fifth installment of the Detective Sergeant McAvoy series, McAvoy tries to find the murderer of Hannah, while dealing with his boss’s apparent breakdown. Aector is a moral person, so the trials and tribulations of being a cop wear on him mightily. Several different story lines merge and diverge — stay on your toes!  Mark’s books are gritty, more police procedural than cozy, with complicated, realistic characters. I'm always happy when I see a new title on the shelf.  9 ½  Kittehs cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji



    Scot FreeScot Free
    by Catriona McPherson

    Lexy, a transplanted Scot, moves to California for love (and husband), gets a Reno divorce, becomes involved in a murder investigation, and things get really weird after that. I really enjoyed this book. Lexy’s off the wall humor and the bizarre cast of characters makes for a fun, fast read. I’m not even going to try to describe all the people she meets at the Last Ditch Hotel. Trust me, try it. 9 kittehs.  cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji


    Blackfish CityBlackfish City
    by Sam Miller

    The climate wars have ended and the earth is ravaged. An amazing feat of engineering, a floating city in the Arctic Circle has degenerated into two populations — the haves and the have-nots. The city seethes with discord and anger. A well-constructed look into one possible future, I enjoyed this read. The several characters who propel the book are interesting and well-drawn, as are the visuals. Complex, depressing, and uplifting at the same time. 9 kittehs. (I would have given it more but I found it confusing at times, probably me, not it!) cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji

     

    Best Beach EverBest Beach Ever by Wendy Wax

    Number six in the 10 Beach Road series, this is a fun chic-lit book.  5 women, 5 different disasters, rock gods, movie stars, babies, commitment issues, and revenge — what’s not to like? You don’t have to start at the beginning of the series to enjoy this summer read. The women are of different ages so their problems and how they deal with them break things up nicely. 8 kittehs.  cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji cat emoji


    *Cat emoji images via freepik

    Another month, another cat pic:  Appo is judging whether you've read enough this week.

    Appo

    Mindy works at the Little Turtle branch.  She's a cat lady, an avid reader, and an old boomer.

    by Craig B | Jul 02, 2018

    cover for Calpurnia's EP, ScoutOkay, so I love the literary reference here with the band’s name and this debut EP called Scout, and the EP itself is even, eh, pretty good, but let’s not get carried away in either direction yet.  For the detractors, yeah, sure, the EP’s fairly derivative of some of the other bands I’ve followed the last few years (Dr. Dog, anyone?), but every song is solid.  Though, as my friend says, a band produces their first album (in this case, EP) writing it over the course of ten years … their second album is written on tour over ten months, thus the oft-observed phenom of the sophomore slump.  However, maybe this band won’t succumb, and if they don’t they will most certainly have my attention.  I guess we’ll see.

    Suggested Use

    Haven’t tried Freegal yet?  Want to make your first foray into online music or just see what the kids these days are up to?  Okay, who am I kidding.  The “kids” who are listening to bands like Calpurnia are mostly 30 somethings with a penchant for 90’s alternative rock … or am I wrong?  Tell me I’m wrong.  Rock’s not dead?  Well, I suppose it can’t be as long as bands like Calpurnia are keeping the dream alive, even with half-hearted EPs.  I mean, come on, write an album already!  Keep Rock alive!


    craig Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by Kayla W | Jun 29, 2018

    Album Recommendation: GUNSHIP

    (Give it up) Stay with me
    (Don't give it up, sunshine)
    (Give it up) Stay awake with me

    When the cloud breaks
    Wake me when it's over
    (It's only rain)   

    “The Mountain” by GUNSHIP

     

    GUNSHIP

     

    I am not an audiophile. That is, I am not someone that often worries about what I am listening to, or sometimes even the quality of what I’m listening to. I just enjoy whatever resonates with me. Which is why I find it hard to articulate why a piece of music is good.  I can oftentimes describe why a narrative is engaging, why something tastes good, why a piece of game play feels right.  But describing music often has me stumped.  So I’ve put off talking about anything like that.

    I started listening to this seemingly fad-tastic retro synthwave band a couple of months ago, due mostly to the fantastic music video made by the legendary claymation artist Lee Hardcastle for their epic song, “Tech Noir”.  I liked a few other tracks, but it took a while until I decided to wander into the whole album. Oh my word, once I did, I found that the experience – the atmosphere, the story – created through the use of synthesizers and oftentimes dreamy vocals and lyrics, sucked me in in a way that barely any other band has before. 

    Synthwave is often known for its heavy instrumental tracks, and GUNSHIP has been noted for how much it balances out their anachronistic 80’s sound with lyrics that often pairs its primary male vocals with a female that weaves together a sense of timeless harmony.  The band can run the gamut from beautiful and dreamy (“The Hegemon”), haunting (“Black Sun on the Horizon”), to celebratory and breath-taking (“Revel in Our Time”).   The wide range of moods used in these evocative, expertly crafted songs have a habit of drawing you in, involving you in the experience on a deep, emotional level that reminds me of being immersed in a lucid dream.

    I’ve been listening to this album for seventy five percent of the music I’ve been listening to while writing the rough draft of my second novel, and it fits in so well with a cyber punk feel that isn’t strictly depressing and seedy.  I can’t recommend it enough, even if you’re driving down the road late at night and want something that invigorates your soul.

    Kayla loves all things weird, wonderful, and macabre.  Her soul’s in writing, and her hobbies include gaming, watching movies and television shows, reading anything and everything. Her black cat’s TOTALLY, 100%, not evil.

    by Evan | Jun 27, 2018
    Book sale room fullThis is how things looked Tuesday morning (June 26th, 2018) at the Main Library. The book sale will run here today and Thursday from 10:00 am to 7:00 pm, and Friday 10 to 4:00 pm -- hard cover $1, soft cover 50 cents.  Saturday is the final sale day and will run from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm -- $5 to fill a bag, as big a bag as you can carry. Proceeds benefit the Friends of the Library

    There are now signs at the tables showing different areas of non-fiction, fiction genres, and children's books. What you see above is only a small portion of what will be available. We will be steadily refreshing the stock as it is sold. So if you come by a second day, you will see a lot of titles that were not available the first day. 

    Book sale fictionThere are tables
    and tables full of popular fiction. 














    Book sale French There are tables and tables of popular
     non-fiction -- and occasionally the exotic   surprise.















    And if you lost one of your HarryBook sale Potter
    Potter books, 
    look no further.
    The books on the table on the
    right side of this 
    photo -- and the 
    books beneath
    it -- are all about
    Harry. 
                                    








    EvanEvan - Married, three children, two grandchildren, formerly a newspaper journalist, now a public librarian, at all times a board game nut.