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16 search results for 15 minute pulitzer

15 Minute Pulitzer: 1967, fix this…
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2016/10/12/fix-this
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1967, fix this…, Book Review: The Fixer by Bernard Malamud "People are sitting at a table having dinner, that's all, but at the same time … their lives are being torn apart." -Anton Chekov Something has broken, is being “torn apart” in this book, this 1967 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Bernard Malamud, The Fixer. As in Chekov’s plays, things are falling apart (in Malamud’s story it is specifically czarist Russia that is falling apart) and Yakov Bok, a.k.a Yakov Shepsovitch, a.k.a. The
15 MInute Pulitzer: 1965, No jokin’
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2016/08/22/no-jokin
15 MInute Pulitzer: 1965, No jokin’, Book Review: The Keepers of the House by Shirley Ann Grau Getting a cross burned on your lawn is no joke. Ask Shirley Ann Grau, author of the Pulitzer Prize winner for 1965, The Keepers of the House. Grau wrote her novel as a narrative of seven generations of the Howland family and their home in the hills of Mississippi. Along the way she was awful hard on Mississippi in her depiction of the state’s history of racism. Basically, she managed to upset the Klan. Thus the cross … and the
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1964, the good year
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2016/07/15/the-good-year-1964
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1964, the good year, No Pulitzer Prize for Fiction was awarded in ’64, which seems kind of like news that makes 1964 a, good news is the Pulitzer Fiction Jury really did try. They looked at four titles most closely. They then recommended those four to the Pulitzer Board, but the bad news is, the Board also found an, Pulitzer year ’64. (Bad news? Kind of, but the good news is, all of the books were pretty, most moving book of the 1964 Pulitzers for me, Killens’ novel about American involvement in WWII
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1960, Doorstops unite!
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2016/03/14/doorstops-unite!
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1960, Doorstops unite!, Book Review: Advise and Consent by Allen Drury And enter the riotous 60’s. If you’re reading through the Pulitzers, the 60’s actually begin with a book written in 1959, Allen Drury’s 1960 Pulitzer Prize winner, Advise and Consent, a novel that was, to be honest, at 616 pages, a bit of a slog. The extensive character list (tabulated for the reader by Drury before the commencement of the first chapter) and its subject (the ultimate “establishment” topic of the Cold War era United States
15 Minute Pulitzer 1973: Optimism, Welty, and Beatlemania
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2017/05/19/15-minute-pulitzer-1973-optimism-welty-and-beatlemania
15 Minute Pulitzer 1973: Optimism, Welty, and Beatlemania, Book Review: The Optimist's Daughter by Eudora Welty ​ If I were to indulge my faux-literary-critic persona here and use some high-sounding phraseology to talk about Eudora Welty’s last novel (the novel that won her the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1973), I would say that The Optimist’s Daughter contains an interesting “reversal of climaxes” that challenges readers to think carefully about what it all means. And by “all” I mean the narrative of the book and also “all” -- what it ALL means
15 Minute Pulitzer 1971: My two/three cents
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2017/02/28/my-two-three-cents
15 Minute Pulitzer 1971: My two/three cents, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction of 1971. Ultimately, since the Fiction Jury had noted that it was, three recommended titles, the Pulitzer Board decided to not award a Fiction prize at all, thus, with Eudora Welty’s final book and near Pulitzer-win, I don’t not take issue with its never-ending dialogic wanderings, and I definitely take issue with the dude on the Pulitzer Jury for Fiction that, member of the Pulitzer Jury put it, and it did not “alienate” me. That said, I can sometimes be a
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1970 and the end of a career
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2017/01/23/the-end-of-a-career
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1970 and the end of a career, Book Review: The Collected Stories of Jean Stafford Yet again, I find myself wanting to say something cavalier about a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction winner, this one from 1970, this time in regard to the selected novel’s delicious extent of vocabulary. But I shall attempt to keep the urge in check, for there is little that is cavalier about The Collected Stories of Jean Stafford. Beautifully written? Yes. A trenchant catalog of the human experience? Yes. Cavalier? No, although
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1968, to controversy and beyond
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2016/11/16/to-controversy-and-beyond
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1968, to controversy and beyond, Book Review: The Confessions of Nat Turner by William Styron I had never read a William Styron book before and mostly only knew his name because of his very long novel, Sophie's Choice. (Okay, it’s only something over 500 pages, but still…) Styron’s Pulitzer Prize-winner of 1968, The Confessions of Nat Turner, isn't quite that long (it’s only nearly 500 pages) but it is still a difficult book in many ways. Based on a 20 page primary document published after the 1831 slave revolt in
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1963, the critics “proven” wrong
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2016/06/20/the-critics-proven-wrong
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1963, the critics “proven” wrong, Book Review: The Reivers by William Faulkner ​ I told some folks recently I was reading William Faulkner’s last novel (his 1963 posthumous Pulitzer win), The Reivers. I explained to them what a reiver (ree’-ver) was (basically, a 16th century Anglo-Scot robber-baron) and that Faulkner’s novel was set in turn-of-the-20th-century Mississippi/Tennessee. They asked how then the novel could be, Lay Dying left me under. I’m just glad the Pulitzers support me in my opinion of these later
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1962, most of this is supposition
Craig is reading all of the Pulitzer-prize winning novels in chronological order. Read his latest review on As You Like It.
http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/home/whats-happening/as-you-like-it/adult/2016/05/16/most-of-this-is-supposition
15 Minute Pulitzer: 1962, most of this is supposition, title. The main theme for this 1962 Pulitzer winner seems to be that of resignation … and not the, way to escape than by writing Pulitzer-Prize-Winning fiction? Certainly superior to spinning