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    by Dawn S | May 10, 2018
    In honor of Mother's Day this weekend, here are some great books for little ones about moms. Enjoy!

    cover image for the day i lost my superpowers 

    The Day I Lost My Superpowers
    by Michaël Escoffier

    This dear little girl tells us all about how she discovered she had superpowers and how she uses them.
    But when those powers fail, and she gets hurt, it's mom who comes to save the day!



    cover image for mommy mama and me

    Mommy, Mama, and Me
    by Lesléa Newman

    Here's a sweet little board book showing a baby's fun day with her two moms.

    cover image for all we know
    All We Know
    by Linda Ashman

    This tender and quiet book describes how some things just come naturally, like the rhythm of waves, the sparkle of stars, and a mother's love.

    cover image for are you my mother

    Are You My Mother?
    by P.D. Eastman

    It's a classic! I know some moms who have the board book version memorized it's such a family favorite.

    cover image for jazzy in the jungle

    Jazzy in the Jungle
    by Lucy Cousins

    Bold, colorful pictures make this book about Mama Jojo and Baby Jazzy playing hide and seek extra fun to read.



    by Kay S | May 10, 2018
    Yep, another month and more books to read!!! Get ready for the summer and check out these books. Take them to the beach, sit out on the patio while the fireflies are all around you. Have fun! These are a few selected books I've been hearing some good reports about. These books will be released from May 15 to June 14, 2018. And, what do I always say? Those are the release dates by the publisher, not the date they will be on your library shelves.

    Historical Romance
     Elizabeth Elliott Elizabeth Elliott
    http://www.elizabeth-elliott.com/
    The Princess
    The Montagues series
    June 5 
    Welcome back Elizabeth after a long absence!
     Eloisa james Eloisa James
    http://eloisajames.com
    Too Wilde to Wed
    Wildes of Lindow Castle series
    May 29
     Paula Quinn Paula Quinn
    http://pa0854.wix.com/paulaquinn
    Laird of the Black Isle
    Highland Heirs series
    May 29

    Historical Fiction

     Kevin Powers Kevin Powers
    http://kevincpowers.com/
    A Shout in the Ruin
    May 15 

    Contemporary Romance/Mainstream Fiction/New Adult/Women's Fiction

    Arif Anwar  Arif Anwar
    https://twitter.com/arifanwar
    The Storm, debut
    Mainstream
    May 15
     Celeste Bradley Celeste Bradley
    http://www.celestebradley.com/
    Susan Donovan
    http://www.susandonovan.com/
    Breathless
    Contemporary romance
    June 12
     Hoang Helen Hoang
    http://www.helenhoang.com/
    The Kiss Quotient
    Contemporary romance
    June 5
     Helena Hunting Helena Hunting
    http://www.helenahunting.com/
    I Flipping Love You
    Shacking Up series
    Contemporary Romance
    May 29
     Julie Anne Long Julie Anne Long
    http://www.julieannelong.com/index.shtml
    The First Time at Firelight Falls
    A Hellcat Canyon Novel series
    Contemporary romance
    May 29
     Karen White Karen White
    http://www.karen-white.com
    Dreams of Falling
    Mainstream
    June 5

    Mystery/Thriller/Suspense/Romantic Suspense

     Tracy Clark Tracy Clark
    https://www.tracyclarkbooks.com
    Broken Places, debut
    A Chicago Mystery series
    Mystery
    May 29 
     Peg Cochran Peg Cochran
    http://www.pegcochran.com/
    Bought the Farm
    Farmer's Daughter Mystery series
    Mystery
    June 5
     Julia Heaberlin Julia Heaberline
    http://www.juliaheaberlin.com/
    Paper Ghosts
    Suspense
    May 15
     Horowitz Anthony Horowitz
    http://www.anthonyhorowitz.com/
    The Word is Murder
    Mystery
    June 5
     Brynn Kelly Brynn Kelly
    http://www.brynnkelly.com
    A Risk Worth Taking
    The Legionnaires series
    Romantic suspense
    May 29
     Kat Martin Kat Martin
    http://www.katmartin.com
    Beyond Control Beyond Control
    The Texas Trilogy series
    Romantic suspense
    May 29

    Paranormal Romance/Fantasy/Science Fiction/Urban Fantasy

     Christine Feehan Christine Feehan
    http://www.christinefeehan.com
    Shadow Keeper
    A Shadow Riders Novel series
    Paranormal romance
    May 29 
     Nalini Singh Nalini Singh
    http://www.nalinisingh.com
    Ocean Light
    Psy-Changeling Trinity series
    Paranormal Romance
    June 12

    Young Adult/Teens

     Morgan Matson Morgan Matson
    http://www.morganmatson.com
    Save the Date
    June 5 

    Inspirational Romance/Mainstream

     Karen Barnett Karen Barnett
    http://www.KarenBarnettBooks.com
    Where the Fire Falls
    Shadows of wilderness series
    June 5
     Hillman Pam Hillman
    http://www.pamhillman.com
    The Road to Magnolia Glen
    Natchez Trace series
    June 5
     Hunter Kristi Ann Hunter
    http://www.kristiannhunter.com
    A Defense of Honor
    Haven Manor series
    June 5
     Courtney Walsh Courtney Walsh
    http://www.courtneywalsh.typepad.com/
    Just Let Go
    June 5
     Catherine West Catherine West
    http://www.catherinejwest.com
    Where Hope Begins
    May 22
     Elizabeth Younts Elizabeth Byler Younts
    Http://www.elizabethbyleryounts.com
    The Solace of Water
    June 5

    Erotica

     Lynda Aicher Lynda Aicher
    http://lyndaaicher.com
    Blind Trust
    The Boardroom series
    May 14 




    kayKay is an avid reader of historical romance books, maybe with a little trip into paranormal land and an occasional journey into mystery world.
    by Dawn S | May 09, 2018

    Last week our Main Library received a single delivery of 9,000 pounds of books!
    WHY?
    Because we're gearing up for the Summer Learning Program and they're just some of the gift books we're giving out as reading incentives.
    piles of books

    We're planning for some amazing things for kids this summer.
    Our Summer Learning Program, SPARK, will have reading incentives, book character visits, cool crafts, puppet shows, toddler music classes, free lunches at some libraries, and so much more!

    You can register online now to earn gifts for reading once June 1st rolls around.
    You can check out our online calendar for all the great events coming in June and July.
    You can check back here on our blog for more Summer Learning information as we get closer.

    Allen County Public Library's SPARK Summer Learning is generously funded in part by the Foellinger Foundation, The Friends of the Library and the Library Foundation.
    Science
    Play
    Arts
    Reading
    Knowledge



    by Craig B | May 08, 2018

    Book Review: John Updikes's winner of the 1982 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Rabbit is Rich

    cover for John Updike's novel, Rabbit is RichI made a note to myself on my new smartphone (which is a very old smartphone, inherited from my wife from when she upgraded, also my first smartphone, kind of like this is my first Updike novel which makes me feel a bit ashamed … I guess you can’t read living authors in college, right?)  while reading John Updike’s 1982 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction win, Rabbit is Rich, that the book is full of “good, terrible news.”  Now, weeks later, I’m not sure exactly what I meant by that, but let me dip into the stream of my consciousness a bit, oh that’s right, for me there was something burdensome about Rabbit’s richness or maybe it was details like Rabbit noting that his wife’s infidelity had made her a “niftier person.”  Kind of good, kind of terrible news, and, honestly, quite fascinating reading.

    My wife says Pennsylvania is God’s Country and on my last visit I started to see what she was talking about and one can tell Updike really was from there; he’s got a feel for the layout, the jolly vibe that everything really terrible in Pennsylvania happened a while ago, and in the book, to back this kind of random claim up, there is no actual tragedy, though there are a couple of moments… well, I’ll just leave it at that.  I think perhaps this is all by design.  As Updike himself said of his writing, he attempted "to give the mundane its beautiful due.”  Okay, but there’s also something of the farce here, which doesn’t necessarily ring any less true to my experience of life, and so, I’m looking forward to reading Rabbit at Rest.  I’m not sure I want to go back and read the other Rabbit novels, at least not right away, you know, because, so much of the tension of Rabbit is Rich comes from what we don’t know and if we resolve the mystery aren’t we just left with the mundane?  Of course, in the end, that may be all we need, at least from the gifted hands of a writer like Updike.

    Craig B author Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by Dawn S | May 05, 2018
    Sometimes listening to a book is better than reading it yourself.
    Take a look at these new books on CD!

    cover image for beast of stone cover image for 365 bible stories for kids cover image for good dog
    cover image for the parker inheritance cover image for lights music code
    cover image for crash landing
    cover image for time jumpers  cover image for the unflushables
    cover image for mad wolf's daughter
    by Angie Fetters-Nitza | May 03, 2018

    Join us to discover just how easily you can write a great story! You’ll decide if you want to tell your story using only pictures, just words, or both. We’ll play a game that will help you choose your characters, what they are like, the setting, and the story’s problem. You get to tell how it all happens.

    Our next Design It! Program will be on Wednesday, May 9 at the Main Library in Children’s Services from 3:30pm-4:30pm in the Globe Room.

    Story1

    During our last Design It! Program, we created musical instruments. The results rocked! Take a look.
    MI7MI4MI2BInstr1MI6B

    by Evan | May 03, 2018

    The Great Courses

    Free college education -- right here at the Allen County Public Library!

    Not a free diploma, mind you. Just the lectures. We're not having you take any tests or write any papers, but we are offering you thousands of hours of free lectures by top college professors.

    It's called The Great Courses series. There are courses you can "take" on your car CD player while commuting to work each day and courses you can watch on DVD. We've got hundreds of them, and I've listened to dozens, appreciating each one. 

    I've caught up with ancient civilizations, the symphonies of Beethoven and most recently the history of the Earth. You might choose the mystical traditions of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam or mathematical decision making or, if you are really ambitious, Medical School for Everyone.

    You can go to a college and audit a course for $900 or take one of ours for free -- courses given by teaching stars. Courses you can play back to review the hard parts. Courses that usually include a book that outlines what you are hearing. 

    It's a good deal. I encourage anyone who wants to learn just for the fun of it to listen up. 


    EvanEvan - Married, three children, two grandchildren, formerly a newspaper journalist, now a public librarian, at all times a board game nut.
    by Cindy H | May 02, 2018
    INDEX_60A58449
    Did you know that arson is the number one most expensive property crime in the United States, and that many of those fires are caused by children and teens? More than 7,100 youth-set fires occur every year, resulting in millions of dollars in damage, and often tragic injuries and even death. Although some of the fires are unintentional, many are not. It is important to learn about this prevalent problem and how to protect your family and property.

    Fire fighter Dave Meadows and mental health counselor Michael Slavkin, experts from the Allen County Juvenile Firesetting Taskforce, will be visiting the Aboite Branch Library on Wednesday, May 9 from 6:00-7:00 PM to give an interactive presentation for children, teens, and parents. Don't miss this opportunity!

    If you have any questions or would like more information, please feel free to call Cindy Harter, Aboite Branch Youth Librarian, at 260-421-1310.
    by Teresa Walls | Apr 30, 2018
    Free Comic Book Day

    Boom! Zap! Pow! Free Comic Book Day is hitting the library! Free Comic Book Day is a worldwide event that happens on the first Saturday of every May.

    Celebrate at the Main Library in Children’s Services!
    9:00 am to 6:00 pm -  Scavenger Hunt and Kids' Comics Giveaway (2 per person, while supplies last)
    10:30 to 11:00 am - Free Comic Book Day Storytime
    11:00 am to 1:00 pm - Costume Factory
    NOON to 1:00 pm - LEGO Club
    12:30 to 1:30 pm - Meet a Superhero
    12:30 to 2:00 pm - Bingo Quest
    2:00 to 3:00 pm - Drawing Workshop with local artists, Matthew Plett & Andrew Kurzen

    Celebrate at the Main Library in the Teens department!  All day, while supplies last, pick up a free comic book or two. Between 2:00 and 5:00 pm, try your hand at solving puzzles to open locked boxes that contain an additional surprise.

    Celebrate at the Georgetown branch library! Free comics for all ages will be given away - 1 per person, while supplies last. Stop by anytime to snap a picture at the photo-op and create your own superhero mask!

    Celebrate at the Grabill branch library! Free comics for all ages will be given away - 1 per person, while supplies last. Stop by anytime to do a scavenger hunt or make a craft.

    Celebrate at the Aboite branch library! Get a free comic book to take home, then join us for a superhero-themed storytime at 2:00pm. We will also have a special visit from Spiderman from 2:30-3:30 pm!

     

    by Becky C | Apr 30, 2018
    Ever wonder what library staff like to read?  Wonder no more!  Here's a quick look at some books we've enjoyed this month.  Click on a book cover to check availability — it’s as easy as that!

    Roomies  A Wizard of Earthsea  Happiness is a Choice You Make
     Sunburn  Little Fires Everywhere  The Fast and the Furriest
     The Vanishing Season  Midlife  An Unkindness of Ghosts
     All the Stars in the Heavens  The Martian  Chimera
       The Gatekeepers  

    Want more recommendations?  Click here for previous What We're Reading posts. 

    Please let us know what books you've been reading that you've really enjoyed.  We're always looking for our next great read!


    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman.
    by Cindy H | Apr 27, 2018
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    Chessy Prout was just 15 years old when a popular, well-respected senior boy at her private boarding school sexually assaulted her. This book is her story of trying to come to terms with what happened to her, seeking justice, and ultimately figuring out how best to live her life as a survivor. At times the story is difficult to take in; Chessy endures a long and invasive legal process and trial, name-calling, constant doubts of her honesty, the loss of friends, and isolation from the school community that she and her family once held dear. Ultimately, it is a highly inspirational story about how she decided to stand up for her rights in the face of adversity, and inspire other survivors to do the same.

    I listened to the audiobook, which is read by Chessy herself. I found this very powerful, to hear the story not only through her words, but in her voice. Although it is horrific what happened to Chessy, it is worth hearing because of how prevalent sexual assault is in our society. It took a lot of bravery for Chessy to come forward with her story. The majority of survivors do not report what happened to them to the police, and after learning about the criticism and bullying Chessy faced as a result of her pursuing justice, it is not surprising that many people choose to keep silent. Although with campaigns such as #metoo becoming prevalent in our culture, there is still a long way to go in teaching young women and men that they have a right to have their bodies respected. I would encourage every teenager, parent, and concerned citizen to learn about Chessy and other survivors' stories.

    This book is available in print and as an audiobook at the library, and as an ebook on Overdrive.
    by Cindy H | Apr 27, 2018
    INDEX_60A58449
    Did you know that arson is the number one most expensive property crime in the United States, and that many of those fires are caused by children and teens? More than 7,100 youth-set fires occur every year, resulting in millions of dollars in damage, and often tragic injuries and even death. Although some of the fires are unintentional, many are not. It is important to learn about this prevalent problem and how to protect your family and property.

    Fire fighter Dave Meadows and mental health counselor Michael Slavkin, experts from the Allen County Juvenile Firesetting Taskforce, will be visiting the Aboite Branch Library on Wednesday, May 9 from 6:00-7:00 PM to give an interactive presentation for children, teens, and parents. Don't miss this opportunity!

    If you have any questions or would like more information, please feel free to call Cindy Harter, Aboite Branch Youth Librarian, at 260-421-1310.
    by Kayla W | Apr 27, 2018

    Playstation 4 Videogame Recommendation: Divinity: Original Sin: Enhanced Edition


    (Grave Marker): “Here lies Master Ragequin's second apprentice. Killed by dying”

     

    Divinity Original sin 

     

    Alright.  I don’t often decide, part of the way through anything, that I NEED to spread the word about it immediately.  The end could be a complete mess that negates the whole experience that came before it (I’ve been burned before on that front).  But forgive me, because this game is just… special.  And I want you folks to play this before the much-celebrated sequel makes its appearance on game consoles this August (it’s so well loved on computer and it’s won many industry awards, to the point where many have called it one of the best CRPGs ever made).   The first game is no slouch, either.  It’s good.  Really good.

    It also happens to be a game that you don’t have to play alone.  Well, it’s not that I don’t also have the Role Playing Game staple of party members as I go questing through the deeply engaging world of surprisingly lighthearted and hilarious Cyseal.  The interesting thing is that this game can, in fact, be co-op.  And not in an online manner. You can choose to play this top-down, tactical RPG all the way through with a buddy, sitting next to you on our couch.   Staring at the same television, sharing the same bowl of popcorn.  Probably at some point threatening your friend because they set you on fire again.  I think the fact that various screens in game depict two characters holding hands should be taken as a sign of the developer’s attitude of playing with a friend or significant other.  They want you to have fun with someone else.

    It’s a glorious experience, and might be considered remarkable enough to merit it being played for that reason alone.  The great thing about Larian Studios’ game is that it’s remarkable any way you slice it. Even if you would prefer to play it alone, I would recommend this game in the same breath that I would recommend the equally as remarkable (sans the couch co-op) Pillars of Eternity

    This is a top-down game that may bring you back to an older CRPG experience (a computer RPG experience, that is) which features a unique battle system that transforms the real time gameplay into a tactical, turn-based battle system. All the way through, the game forces you to make interesting decisions when it comes to what you’re doing and the best way to handle any situation.  That may mean having someone sneak up on an enemy, then strategically having your buddy – either a party member or your co-op partner – dropping in on the fun, perhaps after taking a cheap shot at an enemy.  Or deciding whether to set off a poison cloud on a group of enemies, only to later set the whole thing on fire for a fantastic explosion, then chase it by summoning a rain cloud to douse the charred bones of those monsters that tried to get between you and your quest reward. 

    This is a game of exploration, experimentation, and reading.  Like, a lot of reading.  You’re going to be turning rooms upside-down, looking for clues and loot, deciding who gets what, crafting – basically throwing everything at the wall and seeing what sticks.  For the most part, even the more frustrating moments are often punctuated with interesting characters and with a typically lighthearted, oftentimes silly story that leans hard on its writers’ intelligence.  And the joy with discovering the answer to a puzzle together is a great one, as is planning out how you’re going to sneak past a group of vigilant monsters who’ve turned the countryside into a fireball – or from a group of pesky bandits who keep unleashing a volley of arrows on you from a hidden position on the cliffs above you.  Also, what the heck’s going on with those Douglas Adams’ nightmares in the form of statues telling gullible people that they have given them the ability to fly – and these people quickly take a dive off of a nearby cliff to their deaths? 

    Playing the game had me figuring out how to put a fire out on a ship in a dock (I threw a PHENOMENALLY huge water balloon at the thing), deciding the fate of the friendliest and wordiest sentient clam in all of fiction (I found out later that you could have chosen to eat him(!)), and trying to help a talking head named Nick escape the fate of being a sideshow attraction and hopefully return him to his body (he became a zombie that was usable as a summon spell).  

    I don’t know about you, but I would take these beginning few hours that I’ve spent in Divinity with my S.O over the on-rail experience that most RPGs have left me with.

    Kayla loves all things weird, wonderful, and macabre.  Her soul’s in writing, and her hobbies include gaming, watching movies and television shows, reading anything and everything. Her black cat’s TOTALLY, 100%, not evil.

    by Dawn S | Apr 25, 2018
    Monday was the Grabill Library's last Homeschool STEM Workshop for the school year.

    We had a blast learning a little about material engineering and then getting creative with construction techniques. Take a look!

    girl making cardboard box tower room full of cardboard boxes ready for program boy working on cardboard box tower
    cardbaord tower cardboard tower
    cardboard tower
       

    Homeschool classes are winding down at the libraries this spring, but the Summer Learning Program is just getting into full gear! Learn more about how to participate here. Check out what programs we've got in the works for May, June, and July by browsing our online calendar. Remember to change the date range and other limiters to get to all the good stuff!
    by Emily M | Apr 23, 2018
    Looking for a book recommendation?  Look no further!  Here are a few good books I've enjoyed lately...

    life among the savagesBook Review: Life Among the Savages by Shirley Jackson

    Shirley Jackson is best known for her haunting short story The LotteryThe Lottery, however, couldn’t be more different from Life Among the Savages - a comedic take on the domestic chaos of motherhood.  Published in 1952, Life Among the Savages is a compilation of autobiographical essays written for various women’s magazines.  The premise is simple: Jackson, her husband, and their two young children leave New York City and buy an old farmhouse in Vermont.  Over the next six years two more children are added to the family and shenanigans ensue.  Whether recounting her daughter’s inability to complete any task without including seven imaginary daughters of her own, or the perils of childbirth, or the Herculean task of getting the children dressed, fed, and to school on time each day, Jackson tells tales of everyday life with warmth and self-deprecating humor. 

    theactorslifeBook Review: The Actor’s Life: A Survival Guide by Jenna Fischer

    Like most of America, I loved Jenna Fischer as Pam Beesly on NBC’s The Office, so I was excited when I found out she had written a book.   The Actor’s Life is a guide on to how to make it as an actor, something I have no intention of doing, but I still found it to be a really enjoyable read.  First, it was really fascinating to see how one even goes about becoming an actor.  Second, Fischer shared a lot of amusing stories about her own experiences, so much so, that, in many ways, The Actor’s Life reads like a memoir.  Fischer has an easy, charming writing style that made this book a quick and enjoyable read.  If you have any interest in working as an actor, I would definitely recommend this book, but it’s also great for anyone who is a Jenna Fischer fan. 

    whataliceforgotBook Review: What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty

    Alice is 29 years old.  She adores her husband, is best friends with her sister, and is pregnant with her first child.  Then one day she regains consciousness after a fall, only to discover ten years have passed and she has no memory of them.  She is now 39 years old.  She has three children she cannot remember, a strained relationship with her sister, and is in the middle of a nasty divorce.  Perhaps most frightening for Alice is not that she doesn’t recognize the people around her, but that she doesn’t recognize herself. 

    What Alice Forgot is one of those books that you can read in one sitting.  What has happened in the past ten years to cause such drastic changes in Alice’s life is slowly revealed to her, and therefore the reader, in drips and drops, and I found myself not wanting to put the book down because I was eager to find out what had happened. 

    What about you?  What good books have you read lately?


    EmilyLong before becoming a librarian, Emily was an avid library patron. She enjoys reading fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, biographies, and classic children’s literature. Her favorite book is Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery.

     

    by Angie N. | Apr 20, 2018

    more notes

    Do you hear that?
    Sounds like YOU designing and building cool musical instruments to take home and play. Come see what rockin’ instruments you can create from things like plastic spoons, beans, cardboard tubes, paper plates, and more. We’ll be having some creative rhythmic fun you won’t want to miss during our next Design It! Program at the Main Library in Children’s Services on Wednesday, April 25 from 3:30pm-4:30pm.

    by Angie N. | Apr 18, 2018

    April is designated as National Poetry Month in the United States. It is a time to celebrate poets, their poems, all the poems you love, and the poet in you! Listed below are seven ways you can celebrate National Poetry Month.

    1. Pick a poet whose work you’ve never read and check out a volume of their poetry from the library.
    2. Create an anthology of your favorite poems. Pick your favorite poems, type them up or write them down and create a book to keep, so you can read them again and again. Leave room to add more poems in the future.
    3. Send a favorite poem to a friend via text, email or in a letter.
    4. Write a poem of your very own.
    5. Record yourself reading poetry aloud, your favorites or the ones you’ve written.
    6. Illustrate a poem or two.
    7. Watch videos of poets reading their work.
    What are some other ideas for celebrating poetry? Come on into the library and check out some great volumes of poems, both old and new. 

    Poetry Books
    by Evan | Apr 18, 2018


    You've got this thing about Kroger. Or Google. Or  Acme Anvils. Whatever, there's this company you want to research and/or contact because you like/hate what they do and you may want to invest in them or write a letter of hot and detailed complaint.

    So, you want names and addresses of top executives, maybe even emails.You want to see how they're doing in the stock market, what the recent news is about them, whether they are in any legal trouble.

    The library is here to help. We subscribe to LexisNexis Library Express, and you can use it freely. (It's actually a triple-threat database. Besides business information, it has a database for news stories going back 40 years and another one for legal cases and articles. But today we're talking business.)

    You can reach the database by scrolling down from this link to our website. If you are in one of our libraries, it will open automatically; if you are elsewhere, you'll need to enter your library card number. Either way, you'll open up access to a great deal of corporate information. 

    Using it might require a little patience. For instance, it rewards spelling on a what-you-give-is-what-you-get basis. That's why when I typed in Proctor & Gamble it gave me almost 30 results but not the big headquarters in Cincinnati. Evidently a lot of other people besides me misspell the company name. Type Procter instead of Proctor and wonders await you.. 

    As for Google, when you search for it on LexisNexis and don't find the data you want, be sure to notice the line that says Top-level. That's code for parent company. Google hid itself behind the corporate name Alphabet Inc. a few years ago, but Lexis-Nexis will help you figure that out. 

    Of course, the database gives more information about publicly traded companies than private ones, so Acme Anvils won't show as much. But there's a lot of authoritative data there -- and some of it is not the kind you will easily find on corporate websites. So, dig deep and prosper. 


    EvanEvan - Married, three children, two grandchildren, formerly a newspaper journalist, now a public librarian, at all times a board game nut.
    by sm | Apr 16, 2018

    The books listed here are  new teen romance novels to read for the cold days of April...

    WIDB.cvr.1F.cvr.2LAV.cvr.3SU.cvr.4DEA.cvr.5MOM.cvr.6SES.cvr.7BTTM.cvr.8NT.cvr.9

     

    Scott M
    Scott M, Editor - Scott is known around Shawnee Branch and about town as the “Library Dude” and is kind of squirrelly!  His favorite short story is Leaf by Niggle written by JRR Tolkien and he also works for chocolate brownies and Rice-Crispy treats!

     

    by Becky C | Apr 16, 2018
    Ever wonder what library staff like to read?  Wonder no more!  Here's a quick look at some books we've enjoyed this month.  Click on a book cover to check availability — it’s as easy as that!

    Children of Blood and Bone Nevertheless  Empress of a Thousand Skies 
     Blood of a Thousand Stars  Kindred  Its Better Than It Looks
     Getting Rid of Bradley  Neverwhere  The Cuckoos Calling
     Herland  Summer Hours at the Robbers Library  Life Reimagined
     The Nightingale  The Templars  The Song of Susannah


    Want more recommendations?  Click here for previous What We're Reading posts. 

    Please let us know what books you've been reading that you've really enjoyed.  We're always looking for our next great read!


    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman..