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    by Dawn Stoops | Aug 15, 2018
    Here are just a few books published this year for parents, teachers, homeschool families, and others who work with children. We've got plenty of older, tried and true titles too, so ask your librarian when you need to find just the right book.

    cover image for the art of screen time cover image for you your child and school cover image for what your ADHD child wishes you knew
    cover image for the wild card cover image for the read-aloud family
    cover image for better together
    cover image for rethinking school  cover image for how to raise kind kids
    cover image for the nerdy parents guide to raising a nerdy parent
    by Kay S | Aug 15, 2018
    Yes, it's time for a few fiction upcoming releases coming to a library near you! These are not everything that is coming out - there just wouldn't be enough space for that. Hopefully some of these may be of interest to you.

    Historical Romance
     Tessa Dare Tessa Dare
    The Governess Game
    Girl Meets Duke series
    August 28
     Lorraine Heath Lorraine Heath
    When a Duke Loves a Woman
    Sins for All Seasons series
    August 21
     Sophia Jordan Sophie Jordan
    The Duke Buys a Bride
    The Rogue Files series
    July 24 - Yes, I missed it last month!
     caroline linden Caroline Linden
    An Earl Like You:
    The Wagers of Sin
    August 28

    Historical Fiction

     Pat Barker Pat Barker
    The Silence of the Girls
    August 30/September 11
     Kate Furnivall Kate Furnivall
    The Survivors
    September 6
     Douglas Jackson Douglas Jackson
    Hammer of Rome
    Gaius Valerius Verrens series
    September 6
     Andrew Miller Andrew Miller
    Now We Shall Be Entirely Free
    August 23

    Contemporary Romance/Mainstream/Women's Fiction/New Adult

     kenji jasper Kenji Jasper
    Nostrand Avenue
    Mainstream Fiction/suspense
    August 28 
     Beverly Jenkins Beverly Jenkins

    Second Time Sweeter
    Blessings series
    Contemporary romance
    August 28
     Christina Lauren Christina Lauren
    Josh and Hazel’s Guide to Not Dating
     Sharon Sala Sharon Sala
    Come Back to Me
    Blessings Georgia series
    Mainstream
    August 28
     Tiffany Warren Tiffany L Warren
    The Outside Child
    Mainstream fiction
    August 28
     Carl Weber Carl Weber  
    Influence
    Mainstream fiction
    August 28

    Mystery/Thriller/Suspense/Romantic Suspense

    Nancy Bush  Nancy Bush
    Jealousy
    Mystery
    August 28
     Vivien Chien Vivien Chien
     Dim Sum of All Fears
    Noodle Shop Mystery series
    Mystery
    August 28
     JT Ellison J. T. Ellison
    Tear Me Apart
    Sequel to Lie to Me
    Thriller
    August 28
     steve hamilton Steve Hamilton
    Dead Man Running
    Alex McKnight series
    Thriller
    August 21
     edwin hill Edwin Hill
    Little Comfort
    Hester Thursby Mystery series
    Mystery
    August 28
     sofie kelly Sofie Kelly
    The Cats Came Back
    Magical Cats Mystery series
    Mystery
    September 4
     Ward Larsen Ward Larsen
    Assassin's Run
    David Slaton series
    Thriller
    August 21
     karin slaughter Karin Slaughter
     Pieces of Her
    Thriller
    August 21

    Paranormal/Paranormal Romance/Science Fiction/Fantasy/Urban Fantasy/Horror

     Ilona Andrews Ilona Andrews
    Magic Triumphs
    Kate Daniels series
    Urban Fantasy
    August 28
     robert Jackson bennett Robert Jackson Bennett
     Foundryside
    Founders series
    Fantasy
    August 21
     FG Cottam F. G. Cottam
    The Lucifer Chord
    Horror
    September 1
     john alvide lindqvist John Aivide Lindqvist
    I Am Behind You
    Platerna series
    Horror
    August 23

    Young Adult/Teens

     Elly Blake Elly Blake
    Nightblood
    Frostblood Saga series
    August 21 
     Fischer Nancy Richardson Fischer
    When Elephants Fly
    September 4
     abbi glines Abbi Glines
    Losing the Field
    Field Party series
    August 21
     morgan rice Morgan Rice
    A Crown for Assassins
    Throne for Sisters series
    August 21

    Inspirational Romance/Mainstream Fiction

     colleen coble Colleen Coble
    Freedom's Light
    September 11
     roseanna white Roseanna M White
    An Hour Unspent
    Shadows Over England series
    September 4
     cindy woodsmall Cindy Woodsmall
    As the Tide Comes In
    August 21




    kayKay is an avid reader of historical romance books, maybe with a little trip into paranormal land and an occasional journey into mystery world.
    by Dawn Stoops | Aug 13, 2018
    This morning when my seven year old woke up and asked what we were doing today I explained, among other things, that in two more days he'd start school. He sleepily replied "Then I hope these two days go extra slow."

    Yep, I know how you feel honey!

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    Here's to all the amazing FIRSTS your family experiences this week. May you find the joy in small and big accomplishments.


    by Craig B | Aug 13, 2018

    cover selection from film, AdaptationBook Review: Alison Lurie's winner of the 1985 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Foreign Affairs

    The pun in Alison Lurie’s title of her 1985 Pulitzer Prize winner, Foreign Affairs, seems acceptable mostly because the rest of the book is restrained and full of insightful, character-driven complexities.  For example, “Is Fred Turner likeable?”  I mean, he seems like a nice guy, but then, it’s easy to be nice when no one has ever really told you “No.”  Also, there’s, “Vinnie Miner is a kleptomaniac.”  Yet we seem to be expected to sympathize with her.  Is that ok?  Perhaps I’m the victim of a gross misreading of the text (a bit like the time I misunderstood the point of The Graduate, thank you 500 Days of Summer), but I think we are supposed to sympathize with Vinnie … and her dog … at least, if we’re not, that’s a lot of pages to dedicate to a character that, well, I mean, is this The House of Yes, here?  At least we can say this about Vinnie; she doesn’t seem to steal from friends, just corporations, which, though they can often have a hard row to hoe are at least faceless.

    Speaking of faces, I was struck by the similarities between Alison Lurie and the character Vinnie Miner.  They share an interest in the teaching and writing of children’s literature as well as being immersed in academia.  Considering the kleptomaniac aspect, let’s hope that’s where the similarities stop, but of course that detail offers another chance for an “insightful complexity.”  Is my worry that Lurie is a kleptomaniac (and should never visit my home!) because she wrote herself into a kleptomaniac character actually an overinflated concern with dividing fiction from reality?  Aren’t all stories fiction on some level?  What I mean is that even if Lurie were to write her autobiography we would probably do well to take it with a grain of salt.  It’s probably been dramatized.  She’s human after all and we all remember things differently than others on a regular basis.  Who is to be believed?  And do we really want completely believable elements in our stories?  Most of our lives probably don’t feel as if they were scripted by Spielberg (though Lurie’s life might feel more that way than others).   Often, it’s more like our lives are scripted by Kaufman, and only the first 30 minutes of Adaptation.  Yup, the boring part.  And yet, if we look closely at our non-Spielberg lives (and the first 30 minutes of Adaptation) I feel certain we can learn something.  Or make something up.  Novelists have been doing it for years.

       

    Craig B author Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by Kayla W | Aug 10, 2018
    Movie Recommendation: Paprika


    ...the Internet and dreams are similar. They're areas where the repressed conscious mind escapes.  – Dr. Chiba


    Paprika

     

    Satoshi Kon is the late-great master of the imaginative. Through his body of work, it is apparent that the artist just as equally possessed the ability to bring across this sense of a stark, unfeeling reality, as well as never failing to show a staggering amount of well-honed creativity. I believe that Kon deserves to be remembered in the same breath as Haruki Murakami or Neil Gaiman, where the abnormal is treated as passé and what’s “normal” is treated as exotic. He was an artist that held a sense of underlying humanity – one that was prone to flights of the imaginative and some truly moving instances of empathy - which was, nevertheless, sometimes tempered by a shocking ruthlessness. To me, he could, like so many creators who are lauded as being ahead of their time, peer into some strange vision of the future. This is a trait he shares with some of his personal influences, such as Philip K. Dick and Terry Gilliam. He also happened to be one of those rare and thankfully more than talented enough artists who are not afraid to acknowledge the fourth wall separating fiction from reality - his characters from their audience - but was skilled in breaking it, as shown in his late work, Opus.

    On a personal note, this artist's widely differing and truly fantastic body of work is a lofty goal I aspire to one day live up to creating my own version of. Probably sounds silly, coming from someone with unfinished manuscripts to be comparing themselves to a master, but he is truly one of the great creators whom I am profoundly influenced by.

    To Kon, genre was a set of tropes and tools that he used freely and without any restraint, save for the choice of what is the absolute best one to use in that moment. As an audience member, his work will have you switching effortlessly and in a sophisticated manner between, say, the heavy feels of Millennium Actress to the nail-biting tension in the short film Magnetic Rose. Kon's work is still sometimes unbelievably hard to find (where are you in print, Paranoia Agent and Perfect Blue?), but all of his movies, books, as well as his single television series, are more than exceedingly worthy of being hunted for. I don't mean to bum you out unnecessarily. A good deal of his work is still in print, and I don't foresee a future where all of his work is going to wither into obscurity.

    I can comfortably say that if Kon could have chosen something to do the proverbial mic drop on, he could have done a lot worse than this film. Paprika is a thesis statement to what were his obsessions as a creator, a volatile but somehow immaculate tempering of childlike wonder with chilling, abruptly shocking coldness, as well as a flagrant disregard for a supposed line between reality and imagination. It’s magical realism with a heavy kick to the abdomen of “realism”.  

    Paprika is bright, colorful, and demented one moment, then moody, slow, and emotional the next. It's intelligent, engaging, and is astoundingly "mature", in the sense that it requires the full engagement of its audience and rewards it. The film is the work of a master at the height of his ability, one with a deep and profound understanding of pacing, mood, and the knowledge of just how far to push boundaries. Kon (and I would be remiss to not also cite the legendary Madhouse animation studio who crafted it) took what I can best describe as a proto Inception story (but better) and with a lot of the moody noir reminiscent of Blade Runner, injecting it with personality and color to spare.

    It’s an experience, like all of his filmography, that truly must be seen to give justice to it, but the plot could best be summarized as followed:

    A team of research psychologists use a special, prototype technology which enables them to interact with patients through dreams. Following me on this?

    One of these experimental psychologists, Dr. Chiba, illegally uses a "borrowed" set of the device in order to provide therapy to clients. During these deep dives into their subconscious, she takes on the persona of Paprika in her clients' dreams, transforming her into a carefree, younger woman. As Paprika, Dr. Chiba is able to identify what her clients’ deeply embedded problems are, and for a while things are great. However, although the doctor has good intentions by using the device she sneaks out in order to perform this therapy, there are terrible consequences when one device is stolen by a thief who uses the still prototypical interface to hack into people’s dreams: including the clients that Dr. Chiba had been trying to help.

    The film becomes a unique mix of noir thriller, magical realism, and psychological science fiction, full of beautiful and compelling concepts that can make something as silly as a parade seem uncontrollably sinister, and presents many things which are not what they first appear – and require multiple movie viewings to truly grasp the reality of.

    Although it is based off of a book, I haven’t had the chance to read it myself, so I cannot attest to its quality in comparison to the movie that it became the basis for. What I can vouch for is that this is a truly great film that is more than worth your time.  And if you ever happen to find his short movie collection, Memories, watch it immediately.

    Kayla loves all things weird, wonderful, and macabre.  Her soul’s in writing, and her hobbies include gaming, watching movies and television shows, reading anything and everything. Her black cat’s TOTALLY, 100%, not evil.

    by Dawn Stoops | Aug 09, 2018
    Our family doesn't do a lot of tv watching, but for the screen time we do allow, it's great to get fun stuff from the library - for FREE! My boys, ages 5 & 7, are going to be thrilled to see we've just gotten some new DVDs.
    Take a look!
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    "Whether it's an out-of-control robo-vacuum, a band of fugitive monkeys, or a runaway hot air balloon, Rusty will find the fix! Rusty's got the ingenuity, creativity, and a recycling yard full of the coolest parts and pieces to 'Combine and Design' any gadget, vehicle, or robot that his wild imagination can think up."
    --from the catalog

    cover image for lily's driftwood bay
    "Welcome to Lily's Driftwood Bay! Lily is six years old and lives with her dad and her best friend, who is a seagull named Gull, in a little hut on the beach. Across the way is Driftwood Bay, a special island that exists in Lily's imagination. Every day the sea washes up a new treasure which sparks Lily's imagination about what might be happening on Driftwood Bay."
    --from the catalog

    Ask your librarian for more fun shows on DVD and Bluray!
    by Mindy L | Aug 08, 2018

    Some books sit on your nightstand for weeks as you read a little bit each night. These are not those books.

    The High Tide Club by Mary Kay Andrews

    The High Tide ClubNinety-nine-year-old heiress Josephine Bettendorf Warrick summons attorney Brooke Trappnell to Talisa Island.  Over a few meetings, the ailing Josephine spins a tale of old friendships, secrets, betrayal, and a long-unsolved murder. She wants Brooke to help save her island from developers -- and to find her three best friends from her youth so that she can make amends to them.

    This is a much darker book than many of Andrews' others. It reads well and the characters are interesting and well-drawn. Several times the Kleenexes were needed.

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    Fiction Can Be Murder by Becky Clark

    Fiction Can Be MurderMystery author Charlemagne "Charlee" Russo thinks the twisty plots and peculiar murders in her books are only the product of her imagination - until her agent is found dead exactly as described in Charlee's new, unpublished manuscript. Naturally Charlee becomes the prime suspect. Mostly a cozy with a bit of grit, this is a nice quick read for a summer evening.

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    Medusa Uploaded
    by Emily Devenport

    Medusa UploadedA fast-paced science fiction thriller about the limits of power and control, and the knife-edge distinction between killing for revenge or for a greater good.  Oichi’s voice is exceptional -- it's conversational, funny, and tragic. She, along with the Executives and the servants, has to overcome inherent bias to uncover the devastating plot that could destroy their starship.

    I'm looking forward to the next book in the series!

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    Crime & Punctuation
    by Kaitlyn Dunnett

    Crime and PunctuationMikki Lincoln, newly widowed, moves back to her childhood home (now a fixer-upper), and becomes a freelance editor. Lenape Hollow is not the thriving tourist destination it was decades ago. Not with a murderer on the loose . . .

    Murder, conspiracies, and editing. Mikki’s a fun character, not a gauche 25 year-old. She’s tough and funny and works hard to find out who dunnit.  I look forward to more in the series.

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    In the Valley of the Devil
    by Hank Early 
     

    In the Valley of the DevilI don’t usually post reviews of books I didn’t like but I'm going to make an exception here.  The first book in the series, Heaven's Crooked Finger, was hard to put down. Racism, religion, romance, mysticism, family drama:  it had it all and I was really looking forward to the sequel.

    Those same ingredients are still in the mix in the sequel but somehow nothing jelled this time.  I found myself getting progressively annoyed with the main character, Earl Marcus. How many times do you have to make the same mistake -- how many times do you have to get beat up, cut up, or shot, before you get a clue? I think the author may have been under pressure to get the second book out. The whole book was basically a fugue of the same thing happening to Earl. Over and over.

    Maybe the third book will get the bugs worked out (I am usually willing to give the author a second or third chance).

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    *Cat emoji images via freepik

    Another month, another cat pic:  Ursula aka VOC (very old cat) is taking a nap.  She's over 20 years old.

    VOC

    Mindy works at the Little Turtle branch.  She's a cat lady, an avid reader, and an old boomer.

    by Community Engagement | Aug 08, 2018
    9-26-18 ACPL Constitution 101

    Do you want to learn more about our nation’s Constitution?  Perhaps you want to feel more informed before you head to the polls to vote this November. Check out this 6-session class for adults!

    This fall the Allen County Public Library is partnering with the Allen County Bar Foundation, the League of Women Voters' Fort Wayne chapter and the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics at Purdue University Fort Wayne for a six-week Constitution 101 course offered at the Main library.

    Classes will be held at 6:30 pm in Meeting Room C at the Main Library every Wednesday from September 26 through October 31. There is a cost of $50 for the course and space is limited to 40 participants.  Registration is through the Bar Foundation.

    Find out more at http://www.allencountybar.org/allen-county-bar-foundation/.

    by Dawn S | Aug 07, 2018
    Open a book and open the world. Try one of these new non-fiction books today!

    cover image for coding games in python cover image for the orca scientist cover image for i am never bored
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     cover image for shawn mendes  cover image for seeders
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    cover image for freaky animals cover image for trumpets cover image for being a bee
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    by SM | Aug 06, 2018

    Here are new teen supernatural novels to read for the hot days and nights
    of late Summer...
    BB.cvr1MPJ.cvr2COS.cvr3DC.cvr4WD.cvr5ACOA.cvr6BACAAC.cvr7RQ.cvr8HOA.cvr9

     

    Scott M
    Scott M, Editor - Scott is known around Shawnee Branch and about town as the “Library Dude” and is kind of squirrelly!  His favorite short story is Leaf by Niggle written by JRR Tolkien and he also works for chocolate brownies and Rice-Crispy treats!

     

    by Cindy H | Aug 03, 2018
    Homeschool University is a program at the Aboite Branch where homeschoolers can come together to learn something new and exciting from local experts in a variety of subjects. Homeschool University is designed for homeschoolers ages 7-17 and is held the third Thursday of every month from 2:00-4:00 pm.

    In August, we will have an expert from the Allen County Parks Department teach us all about birds and their habitats. We will also get to learn how to make a simple bird feeder out of a pine cone to take home to feed the birds in our neighborhoods!

    In September, we have Meghan Houser from Wholesome Roots Cooking coming to teach us how to cook some awesome basic recipes. Those with food allergies and sensitivities will be accommodated!

    In October, we have local dancer Zion Tinsley returning to teach us the foundations of hip-hop dancing, including breakdancing and freestyle techniques. This was one of our most popular sessions, so don't miss it!

    This program does require registration, so be sure to click the links above to reserve your spot. You can also call the Aboite Branch at 260-421-1310 to register. Don't miss this awesome opportunity for homeschoolers, we hope to see you soon!
    by Evan | Aug 03, 2018
    Bloody ShirtSometimes I read books because I should read them, even if I don't immediately want to. They're like eating unseasoned vegetables -- nourishing but possibly bitter. Still, I do feel enriched after finishing them, and before long I will choose another one.

    The broccoli in my CD player this month is The Bloody Shirt: Terror after Appomattox by Stephen Budiansky. Actually, it's a pretty interesting read, but the subject matter -- how the Ku Klux Klan and its supporters won the peace after the Civil War -- is so dispiriting that I have to take it in doses.

    Most of the book tells the stories of several individuals who tried to make Reconstruction work -- tried to give black Americans equal rights in the South. They displayed a lot of courage, but it turned out the Confederacy was not the only Lost Cause.

    Racism pervades time and space in our country. (In fact, we are getting a new book about how black settlers were abused in Indiana and the rest of the Old Northwest. The title of Anna-Lisa Cox's work is The Bone and Sinew of the Land: America's Forgotten Black Pioneers and the Struggle for Equality.) But powerful 19th century Southern whites celebrated their racism, made it the bedrock of their society -- and millions of people have suffered accordingly. 

    One of the buzz terms in my own social circles is "white privilege." It's a bitter morsel indeed -- hard for a lot of people to swallow in today's time of supposed equal opportunity. But when you work through something like The Bloody Shirt, you can see how racism is down but not out. 

    Anyway, reading for fun is great stuff, but I hope people will also use the library to read about the problems of our world -- be they social, moral, environmental or otherwise. Hey, a few months ago I even listened to the autobiography of a politician for whom I had no love. I still don't love him very much, but at least I can better understand him.


    EvanEvan - Married, three children, two grandchildren, formerly a newspaper journalist, now a public librarian, at all times a board game nut.
    by Community Engagement | Aug 02, 2018
    First Steps in Music

    New Program! First Steps in Music

    Join us for a new program at our branches this fall! First Steps in Music is for children ages 0-3 and their caregivers.

    The goal of First Steps in Music is to enable all participants to reach their full potential in singing, vocabulary, and movement skills, with an emphasis on developing sensitivity to the expressive qualities in music. Each class is designed to be playful and enjoyable to children, while providing a carefully planned curriculum that includes developmentally appropriate activities. Children are not taught formally about the specifics of music, but rather they play with music through a series of eight well-rounded activities based on the First Steps in Music curriculum.
    The Fort Wayne Children’s Choir offers First Steps in Music classes to children ages 0 to 3 years old in coordination with the Allen County Public Library, and funded by the PNC Bank Foundation and Three Rivers Credit Union Foundation.
     
    Through the 8 basic activities included in classes based on the First Steps in Music curriculum, children and their parents/caregiver experience singing, creative movement, simple instruments, finger-plays and more with the help of the rich collection of traditional songs and rhymes from past generations.
     
    Example activities for First Steps in Music:
    • Pitch exploration
    • Song fragments
    • Simple songs
    • Arioso (Child-centered tunes)
    • Song tales
    • Movement exploration
    • Movement for form and expression
    • Movement with the beat

    First Steps in Music preview programs will be held at the following dates, times, and locations:

    Wednesday, August 22 at 10:30 am - Hessen Cassel Branch

    Thursday, August 23 at 10:30 am - Waynedale Branch

    Friday, August 24  at 10:30 am - Aboite Branch

    Tuesday, August 28 at 10:30 am - Tecumseh Branch

    Wednesday, August 29 at 10:00 am - Main Library Children's Services

    Thursday, August 30 at 10:30 am - Shawnee Branch


    Join us for the full series of First Steps in Music programs this September and October, exclusively at our Shawnee and Aboite branches!

    Shawnee will host First Steps in Music on Thursdays at 10:30 am on the following dates:
    September 6, 13, 20, & 27
    October 4, 11, 18, & 25

    Aboite will host First Steps in Music on Fridays at 10:30 am on the following dates:
    September 7, 14, 21, 28
    October 12, 19, 26.

    by Craig B | Aug 01, 2018

    cover for Bebe Rexha's album, ExpectationsThis debut album, Expectations, from Rexha has some delightful self-discountenancing / awareness (such as these lines from "I’m a Mess," “Everything's gonna be alright / Everything's gonna be OK / It's gonna be a good, good life / That's what my therapist say”) and Rexha did kind of break my heart with "Grace" (pun intended; listen to the song, it will all come clear) near the end of the album, but I wish I could have squared some of the lyrics from that song with the song following it, "Pillow."  I mean, if you’re lonely and hugging your ‘pillow’ maybe you should have stuck with that near perfect guy from "Grac …" ahh, I don’t know.  We’re all a bit of a mess aren’t we?

    Suggested Use: Need some music to help you get back up to speed on “adult-ing” in your day-to-day life?  The pop lightheartedness of Rexha’s album combined with its semi-world-weary outlook typical of many in their late 20’s should help get you out of bed, schedule that dentist appointment, and/or budget the increase in your monthly commitment to your 401(k) you’ve been putting off.  I know, it’s tough to make good on the promised freedoms of adulthood when you realize most of what your parents spent their time doing involved checking boxes on organizational forms, but it will all seem a little better after a track or two from Expectations and that first cup of coffee, I promise.  If not, if I’m wrong, I do apologize for promoting a misshapen set of “expectations.”


    craig Craig B is a thirty-something lover of books, movies, and rock and roll whose grandmother still worries that he might not be eating enough. (Love you, Grandma!) He lives with his charming wife in the small town of Berne, IN (in sight of the clock tower) where he busies himself keeping the Roses of Sharon in check and training his chinchilla in the ancient arts of the Ninja. Craig’s current favorite book is Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
    by sm | Aug 01, 2018

    TeensTopTen_logo_web

    How many of these books have you read?  There is still time before voting!  The Teens' Top Ten is a "teen choice" nominee list, where teens across the country vote on their favorite titles each year. Readers ages twelve to eighteen will vote online between August 15 and Teen Read Week™ (October 7-13, 2018) on the Teens' Top Ten site. The winners will be announced the week after Teen Read Week. Click on the YouTube video to see the nominees or a list is available below.

     

    • All Rights Reserved by Gregory Scott Katsoulis. Harlequin Teen. 9780373212446.
    • The Black Witch by Laurie Forest. Harlequin Teen. 9780373212316.
    • Book of Lies by Teri Terry. Clarion/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 9780544900486. 
    • Caraval by Stephanie Garber. Flatiron. 9781250095251.
    • Defy the Stars by Claudia Gray. Little, Brown and Company. 9780316394109.
    • The Disappearances by Emily Bain Murphy. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 9780544879362. 
    • How to Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Blake. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 9780544815193. 
    • I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez. Knopf/Random House. 9781524700485.
    • The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz. Clarion/ Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 9780544586505.
    • Invictus by Ryan Graudin. Little, Brown and Company. 9780316503075.
    • The Last Magician by Lisa Maxwell. Simon Pulse/Simon & Schuster. 9781481432078. 
    • Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds. Caitlyn Dlouhy Books/Atheneum Books for Young Readers/Simon & Schuster. 9781481438254. 
    • Mask of Shadows by Linsey Miller. Sourcebooks Fire. 9781492647492.
    • Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu. Roaring Brook/Macmillan. 9781626726352.
    • Once and For All by Sarah Dessen. Viking/Penguin. 9780425290330.
    • One of Us is Lying by Karen M. McManus. Delacorte/Random House. 9781524714680. 
    • Paper Hearts by Ali Novak. Sourcebooks Fire. 9781492653363.
    • Remember Me Always by Renee Collins. Sourcebooks Fire. 9781492647607. 
    • Rosemarked by Livia Blackburne. Disney-Hyperion. 9781484788554.
    • Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor. Little, Brown and Company. 9780316341684.
    • Turtles All the Way Down by John Green. Dutton/Penguin. 9780525555360.
    • Warcross by Marie Lu. G. P. Putnam’s Sons/Penguin. 9780399547966.
    • Waste of Space by Gina Damico. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 9780544633162. 
    • Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo. Random House. 9780399549731. 
    • Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crowley. Knopf/Random House. 9781101937648.

     

     

     

    by Cindy H | Aug 01, 2018
    Homeschool University is a program at the Aboite Branch where homeschoolers can come together to learn something new and exciting from local experts in a variety of subjects. Homeschool University is designed for homeschoolers ages 7-17 and is held the third Thursday of every month from 2:00-4:00 pm.

    In August, we will have an expert from the Allen County Parks Department teach us all about birds and their habitats. We will also get to learn how to make a simple bird feeder out of a pine cone to take home to feed the birds in our neighborhoods!

    In September, we have Meghan Houser from Wholesome Roots Cooking coming to teach us how to cook some awesome basic recipes. Those with food allergies and sensitivities will be accommodated!

    In October, we have local dancer Zion Tinsley returning to teach us the foundations of hip-hop dancing, including breakdancing and freestyle techniques. This was one of our most popular sessions, so don't miss it!

    This program does require registration, so be sure to click the links above to reserve your spot. You can also call the Aboite Branch at 260-421-1310 to register. Don't miss this awesome opportunity for homeschoolers, we hope to see you soon!
    by Cindy H | Jul 30, 2018
    It is hard to believe that summer is winding down and we are getting ready to get back into our school-year routines. Many of the Aboite Branch's regular programs took a hiatus for the summer, so we are excited to tell you about the wonderful programs we have coming back starting in August!

    We have three weekly storytimes designed for a variety of ages. Baby Storytime, designed for those under 18 months, is available every Monday at 10:30am. Toddler Storytime, for those ages 18 months-3 years, is every Wednesday at 10:30am. Family Storytime, designed for children of all ages, is every Thursday at 10:30am. We are also very happy to offer Family Storytime the second Saturday of every month at 10:30am.

    PAWS to Read is a fantastic program for children of all ages to have the opportunity to read to one of our trained therapy dogs, Maggie and Murphy. This program is every Monday from 6:30-7:30 pm.

    Young at Art is available every Wednesday right after Toddler Storytime from 11:00-11:30 am for children ages 2-5. This program is a child-led, process art experience with different projects each week, utilizing different media including paint, crayon, markers, glue, clay, and recycled materials.

    LEGO Club is one of our most popular programs. This all-ages program is every Wednesday from 4:00-5:30 pm. We have tons of LEGOs of all kinds available for you to build a special creation. When you are finished, we will exhibit your design in our display case for a week!

    Finally, if you are 12 or under, check out our Hooked on Books book club for kids! Every second Friday of the month from 4:00-5:00 pm we meet to discuss our favorite books we've been reading over tasty snacks, to be followed by fun games. Regular book club members will also get customized book recommendations each month!

    For questions about any of these programs, please call the Aboite Branch at 260-421-1310. We hope to see you soon!
    by Becky C | Jul 30, 2018
    One of my favorite types of questions at the reference desk involves investigating what book a person is looking for when they only remember a few details -- the type of book, a general outline, maybe a character's name.  Cover details can also be helpful.  Between the wealth of online resources available, the fact that I personally read a lot, and the fact that I'm acquainted with a lot of people who read a lot, it's rare to not be able to match the remembered details to the book.  It's not always a fast discovery -- the fewer the details, the longer it tends to take.  There are instances, however, when even a wealth of remembered details do not lead to an immediate answer.  

    Recently, I decided to put my readers' advisory skills to the test.  There are a few books that I read as a teenager back in the 1980s that I remember better than books I read just last year.  I'm not referring to the required reading in English class, either, although I can still feel my heart's reaction to the The Pigman by Paul Zindel.  I'm referring to the mass market paperbacks that I could typically finish in an afternoon. 

    One book I remember particularly well was about a girl named Marnie and a boy named Lucas.  While their parents were friends, they were not.  When the story began, they lived in a city.  Then, both sets of parents decided that it would be best to move to the country, together.  They buy a farm and share a house.  Marnie is devastated -- at first.  But somewhere along the way, she discovers that she has feelings for Lucas.  Given their prior antagonistic relationship, this is awkward.  She pretends to knit a sweater for herself, but deliberately sizes it to him, so that the obvious thing to do is to give it to him.

    That's a fair amount of detail, right?  I even vaguely remembered the cover of the book -- I remembered that the girl was a brunette and the guy was blond.  But I could not remember the title or the author.  So, I approached it the way I would any other question like this one.  I first tried keyword searches -- many library and bookstore records include basic summaries.  No luck. No luck with NoveList either.

    Next, I turned to my good friend, Google.  I began with a Google image search for 1980s "teen romance" "book covers"; I saw many covers I remembered, but not the one I was looking for.  I created a keyword search for "1980s teen romance fiction" and received several results.  Goodreads has a Teen Romance of the 1980s list and I scanned it first.  I clicked a few titles that seemed promising but didn't find a match.  If I had scanned the Goodreads list for Out of Print '80s Teen Series, I would have found my book, but I passed that list by -- and I'm glad I did.  Why?  Because my longer search led me to discover an amazing blog called Cliquey Pizza.  It hasn't been updated since 2014, but its posts live on, and if you are interested in teen fiction from the 1980s, it's a treasure trove of information.  The blogger evidently loved teen fiction and wrote a series of detailed posts focusing on the popular series from that decade. 

    While scrolling down a  post published on February 5, 2010, titled 80's Wildfire Teen Romances, I saw it.  The cover featured a blond guy in a flannel shirt with his arms around a brunette in a country-western shirt.  I remember wishing that guy would enroll in my high school -- and since I'm a brunette, it was easy to picture myself as the girl on the cover. And, if there was any doubt that this was The One, it was erased the minute I read the description the blogger had included:  

    An April Love StoryToday,” My father announced, “I bought a farm in North Carolina. We’re leaving the city, Marnie.  We’re going back to the land.” Back to the land?  Leaving the city? Marnie Macdonald can’t believe her ears, her parents must be kidding. Worse, they’re going with the Petersons…sharing a house with them. And Marnie can’t stand their son Lucas. At first. But by April, when the MacDonalds and Peterson’s have lived and worked together for almost a year, Marnie finds herself head-over-heels in love with Lucas! Now if Lucas would only notice.

    The book in question is An April Love Story by Caroline B. Cooney.  We don't have a print copy in the system but it's available online via Hoopla.  Like my teenage self, I read it in an afternoon, and I'm pleased to say that it has stood the test of time.  I loved it then and I love it now. 

    What about you?  Are there books you have fond memories of but you just can't recall the title or the author?

    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman..
    by Becky C | Jul 27, 2018
    Ever wonder what library staff like to read?  Wonder no more!  Here's a quick look at some books we've enjoyed this month.  Click on a book cover to read a summary and check availability — it’s as easy as that!

    General Fiction
    How to Walk Away  Florida   How to Paint a Dead Man
     One Less Problem Without You  The Ninth Hour  House Rules
     The Chilbury Ladies Choir  The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society  Frankenstein
     The Goldfinch  Tell the Machine Goodnight  


    Horror
    The Outsider    

    Mystery/Suspense

     End Game Ill Will   The Woman in the Window
     A Taste for Vengeance  The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie  


    Romance
    In His Hands  Love and Other Words  

    Science Fiction/Fantasy

    The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy  Ashes  Persepolis Rising
     Ka  Ivory and Bone  Mistborn
     All Systems Red  Artificial Condition  


    Young Adult
    The Poet X Children of Blood and Bone   My Plain Jane

    Children's

    Adventure According to Humphrey  Paddington Bear in the Garden   


    Graphic Novels
    My Boyfriend Is A Bear  Nimona   

    Want more recommendations?  Click here for previous What We're Reading posts. 

    Please let us know what books you've been reading that you've really enjoyed.  We're always looking for our next great read!

    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman..
    by Becky C | Jul 27, 2018
    Ever wonder what library staff like to read?  Wonder no more!  Here's a quick look at some books we've enjoyed this month.  Click on a book cover to read a summary and check availability — it’s as easy as that!

     Best Cook in the World  The Boys in the Boat  Look Alive Out There
     Midnight in Peking  The Jesuit Guide to Almost Everything  How to Change Your Mind
     Spook  The Order of Time  Calypso
       The Glass Castle  


    Want more recommendations?  Click here for previous What We're Reading posts. 

    Please let us know what books you've been reading that you've really enjoyed.  We're always looking for our next great read!

    Becky CBecky likes to read … A LOT. When she’s not reading, she likes to pretend that she can garden. Her favorite books are The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz and The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman..